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SAVING CLAUSE IN EVENT OF UNCONSTITUTIONALITY. SEC. 32. If any provision of this Act, or the application there. of to any person or circumstances, is held invalid, the remainder of the Act, and the application of such provision to other persons or circumstances, shall not be affected thereby.

Approved, May 26, 1924.

1926 AMENDMENT.
[PUBLIC-No. 29469TH CONGRESS)

[H. R. 9761] An Act To admit to the United States, and to extend naturalization privileges to, alien veterans of the World War.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of, the United States of America in Congress assembled, That (a) as used in this Act, the term "alien veteran" means an individual, a member of the military or naval forces of the United States at any time after April 5, 1917, and before November 12, 1918, who is now an alien not ineligible to citizenship; but does not include (1) any individual at any time during such period or thereafter separated from such forces under other than honorable conditions, (2) any conscientious objector who performed no military duty whatever or refused to wear the uniform, or (3) any alien at any time during such period or thereafter discharged from the military or naval forces on account of his alienage.

(b) Terms defined in the Immigration Act of 1924 shall, when used in this Act, have the meaning assigned to such terms in that Act.

SEC. 2. An alien veteran shall for the purposes of the Immigration Act of 1924 be considered as a nonquota immigrant, but shall be subject to all the other provisions of that Act and of the immigration laws, except that

(a) He shall not be subject to the head tax imposed by section 2 of the Immigration Act of 1917;

(b) He shall not be required to pay any fee under section 2 or section 7 of the Immigration Act of 1924;

(c) If otherwise admissible, he shall not be excluded under section 3 of the Immigration Act of 1917, unless excluded under the provisions of that section relating to

(1) Persons afflicted with a loathsome or dangerous contagious disease, except tuberculosis in any form;

(2) Polygamy;
(3) Prostitutes, procurers, or other like immoral persons ;
(4) Contracts laborers;
(5) Persons previously deported;
(6) Persons convicted of crime.

SEC. 3. The unmarried child under eighteen years of age, the wife, or the husband, of an alien veteran shall, for the purposes

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of the Immigration Act of 1924, be considered as a nonquota immigrant when accompanying or following within six months to join him, but shall be subject to all the other provisions of that Act and of the immigration laws.

SEC. 4. The foregoing provisions of this Act shall not apply to any alien unless the immigration visa is issued to him before the expiration of one year after the enactment of this Act.

SEC. 5. An alien veteran admitted to the United States under this Act shall not be subject to deportation on the ground that he has become a public charge.

SEC. 6. Nothing in the immigration laws shall be construed as subjecting any person to a fine for bringing to a port of the United States an alien veteran who is admissible under the terms of this Act, even though such alien would be subject to exclusion if this Act had not been enacted.

SEC. 7. An alien veteran shall, if residing in the United States, be entitled, at any time within two years after the enactment of this Act, to naturalization upon the same terms, conditions, and exemptions which would have been accorded to such alien if he had petitioned before the armistice of the World War, except that such alien shall be required to appear and file his petition in person and to take the prescribed oath of allegiance in open court.

Approved, May 26, 1926.

[PUBLIC_No. 296—69TH CONGRESS]

[H. R. 11204] An Act Exempting from the provisions of the Immigration Act of 1924 certain Spanish subjects residents of Porto Rico on April 11, 1899.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That all Spanish subjects who on April 11, 1899 (whether adults or minors), were bona fide residents of Porto Rico or adjacent islands which comprised the Province of Puerto Rico and who, in conformity with Article IX of the treaty between the United States and Spain of April 11, 1899, have preserved their allegiance to the Crown of Spain, may be admitted into Porto Rico without regard to the provisions of the Immigration Act of 1924, except section 23.

Approved, May 26, 1926.

CHAPTER IV.

THE BENEFICIAL AND EXACTING CHANGES UNDER

THE 1924 ACT.

The most important provision of the new Immigration Law is the change in the annual quota to.2 per cent of the number of foreign persons who reside in the United States as determined by the census of 1890, instead of the 3 per cent quotai under the Act of 1921. The provision for the admittance, outside of the quota, of the wives of citizens of the United States who reside in the United States, and their children under 18 years of age. Also, the preference for the father and mother, and unmarried children between the ages of 18 and 21 years of age, of American citizens, and for those skilled in agriculture. Another class of non-quota immigrants, are allowed for ministers of any religious denominations and professors of colleges, their wives and unmarried children under 18. Bona fide students over 15 years of age are admitted as non-quota immigrants, for the purpose of studying in higher institutions of learning, such as medicine, dentistry, law, engineering, etc. The above are the beneficial features of the new

law.

The exacting and restricting features of the new law are that physicians, engineers, artists, actors, singers, nurses, lecturers and domestic servants are barred as non-quota immigrants, under the old law, and will be charged as regular quota under the new law. Another exacting feature under the new law, is the withdrawal of the permission to be admitted to the United States as non-quota immigrants to those aliens who, for five years, continuously resided in the Dominion of Canada, Newfoundland, the Republic of Mexico, the Republic of Cuba, the Republic of Haiti, the Dominican Republic, the Canal Zone, or an independent country of Central or South America. Under the present law, only those aliens who were born in the above countries, their wives and unmarried children under 18 years of age, are allowed to come in as non-quota immigrants. Under the new law, no matter how long an alien has resided in the above countries he would not get any preference on account of the above, but would be subject to the quota of the country of his birth.

Another very important feature of the new Immigration Law is the requirement of an immigration visa from every immigrant entering the United States after July 1st, 1924. The immigration visa can only be issued by the American Consular officers abroad, and no person without an immigration visa can be permanently admitted to the United States. Another feature is that an immigration visa will not guarantee his admission to the United States, if he fails to meet the requirements under the Immigration Law.

The new law also provides for the re-admission of immigrants legally admitted to the United States who wish to go for a temporary visit abroad without an immigration visa. Such permit is issued by the Commissioner General of Immigration for a period not exceeding one year. Extensions can be had for six months, if necessary.

The most exacting feature under the new law, is the deportation of aliens, under Section 14, who enter the United States illegally at any time. Under the Act of 1917 there were three and five year limitations for deportation. Under the new law, any alien can be deported at any time if it is found that he is illegally in the United States.

Under the old law, American citizens could adopt and bring in orphans, but under the new law no child or orphan can be admitted to the United States, unless the adoption took place before January 1st, 1924.

No fiancees are admitted or given preference under the new law.

STEPS REQUIRED FOR ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES.

The necessary requirements for aliens, step by step, to gain admission to the United States are as follows:

To simplify the procedure, I hereby classify the various classes of aliens, as follows:

(a) Non-immigrants. (b) Non-quota immigrants. (c) Preference within quota immigrants. (d) Regular quota immigrants. (e) The importation of skilled labor. (f) The admission of student laborers. (g) The admission of Exhibitors and their employees. The classes of Immigrants heretofore set forth are defined as follows:

NON-IMMIGRANTS. Under (a) the following:

(1) A government official, his family, attendants, servants, and employees; (2) an alien visiting the United States temporarily as a tourist or temporarily for business or pleasure; (3) an alien in continuous transit through the United States; (4) an alien lawfully admitted to the United States who later goes in transit from one part of the United States to another through foreign contiguous territory; (5) a bona fide alien seaman serving as such on a vessel arriving at a port of the United States and seeking to enter temporarily the United States solely in the pursuit of his calling as a seaman; and, (6) an alien entitled to enter the United States solely to carry on trade under and in pursuance of the provisions of a present existing treaty of commerce and navigation.

A Non-Immigrant desiring to enter the United States should write to his nearest American Consul abroad, stating that he desires to go to the United States as a tourist or for business, giving

full details and the reason for his journey. If the non-immigrant has relatives in the United States, it is advisable to have the relative execute an affidavit and send it to the American Consul abroad stating that his relative in Europe wishes to come to the United States for a visit and that he will guarantee the visitor's veturn within the time allowed in the visa. It is always advisable for those who desire to come for business, to present absolute proof to the American Consul that he is coming to the United States for that purpose. For those who come to visit the United States, it is advisable to purchase a return ticket, and prove to the Consul that they have enough money with them and will not become a public charge while in the United States.

The above non-immigrants are not charged to any quota allotment, and can have their passport visaed at any time, upon satisfactory proof to the American Consul abroad that they are non-immigrants and are entitled to admission as such to the United States. It is absolutely within the discretion of the American Consuls abroad to visa the passports of a non-immigrant. Th.. passport visa by the American Consul abroad only means that the non-immigrant is entitled to depart for the United States. This does not mean that they are entitled to admission to the United States; it only means that they are entitled to proceed to the United States. If upon arrival in the United States, at the port of entry, the immigration officer is convinced that the alien in possession of the non-immigrant passport visa is not entitled to admission, for some reason or other, he may be excluded, otherwise will be admitted.

ALIENS IN CONTINUOUS TRANSIT. Every alien seeking a landing for the purpose of proceeding directly through the United States to a foreign country, is examined by Immigration Inspector, and if found to be a member of any of the excluded classes he will be refused permission to land, in the same manner as though he intended to remain in the United States. He must prove to the Immigration Inspector in charge of the port of entry that a bona fide transit only is intended, and that he does not seek such transit privilege for the purpose of evading or violating the provisions of the Immigration Law. It is advisable for the above aliens to furnish a bond in the sum of Five Hundred Dollars, conditioned that the alien, by continuous transit, will pass through and out of the United States within the time therein to be specified. The longest time that an alien can be in transit is sixty days.

NON-QUOTA IMMIGRANTS.
Under (b) the following:

(1) An immigrant who is the unmarried child under 18 years of age, or the wife, of a citizen of the United States who resides therein at the time of the filing of a petition under section 9; (2) An immigrant previously lawfully admitted to the United States, who is returning from a temporary visit abroad; (3) t.

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