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The National Association for Constitutional Government was formed for the purpose of preserving the representative institutions established by the founders of the Republic and of maintaining the guarantees embodied in the Constitution of the United States. The specific objects of the Association are:

1. To oppose the tendency towards class legislation, the unnecessary extension of public functions, the costly and dangerous multiplication of public offices, the exploitation of private wealth by political agencies, and its distribution for class or sectional advantage.

2. To condemn the oppression of business enterprise,—the vitalizing energy without which national prosperity is impossible; the introduction into our legal system of ideas which past experience has tested and repudiated, such as the Initiative, the Compulsory Referendum, and the Recall, in place of the constitutional system; the frequent and radical alteration of the fundamental law, especially by mere majorities; and schemes of governmental change in general subversive of our republican form of political organization.

3. To assist in the dissemination of knowledge regarding theories of government and their practical effects; in extending a comprehension of the distinctive principles upon which our political institutions are founded; and in creating a higher type of American patriotism through loyalty to those principles.

4. To study the defects in the administration of law and the means by which social justice and efficiency may be more promptly and certainly realized in harmony with the distinctive principles upon which our government is based.

5. To preserve the integrity and authority of our courts; respect for and obedience to the law, as the only security for life, liberty, and property; and above all, the permanence of the principle that this Republic is "a government of laws and not of men.”

L 5915
JUN 1 1932

The Menace of Paternalism

By Otto H. Kahn

One who has noted the marvelous ment of our French friends and comwork and the magnificent achievements rades things which the bureaucratic of the American Army in France may routine of ever so many years had propound the following question: What found itself impotent to deal-with? is the underlying cause for the phe- I have heard these questióris asked nomenon that our boys, taken from the and debated a good many times dately most diversified walks of life, brought both in England and France, and.the. up in surroundings and in a spirit consensus

consensus of replies was this: "Yori. which are the very negation of a mar- in America have always been a nation tial disposition, became in an incredibly of private enterprise and individual · short space of time soldiers of first initiative. Your incentive has never rate efficiency; that our business men, been to get a governmental title or a farmers, mechanics, college boys are bureaucratic position. Your incentive making competent, indeed excellent was zest and scope for doing things, officers; that our West Pointers, taken the joy of creative effort, a certain from small army posts or positions in crude, rough-hewn, unsystematic, but Washington, were found qualified gen- effective idealism, and also, of course, erally not only to command large the material reward of successful bodies of troops, but that amongst achievement. You have had no caste them were discovered men fitted, when or fixed class, either aristocratic or buthe emergency arose, to plan and exe- reaucratic. You have given almost uncute the business undertakings of war limited, perhaps too unlimited, scope to on a stupendous scale with a high de- ambition, ability, force, imagination, gree of organizing and administrative hard work. Your employee of today ability—though these men would be the was and is the employer of tomorrow. last to dispute that a considerable share The state, far from enjoying the halo of the credit for the results accom- descended from kingly times of someplished is due to those who, at the thing resembling omnipotence and omvery start of the war, eagerly volun- niscience, and being all-pervasive in its teered from civil life? Why did our functions, was largely limited in its accommanding officers, our engineers, tivities, and you had a healthy skeptiand others at various French ports, at cism of governmental capacity to do our army bases, along our great line of things well. Under the stimulus of supplies, in a strange country, under these conditions you have produced a conditions entirely new to them, dem- race, daring, keen, quick-witted, adaptonstrate the capacity of rapidly sizing able, self-reliant. The American of toup situations, of boldly meeting and day, as we see him in the officers and overcoming difficulties, of vigorously men of your forces, and in the business cutting the red tape of generations, of men we have met, is the product of accomplishing to the admiring amaze- sturdy individualism."

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