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It may be noted that one-half, or $38,752, of the $77,504 expended for old-age assistance grants to aliens in January is chargeable to State funds, the other half being subject to Federal reimbursement.

Immediate submission of this preliminary information is possible because of its availability in records maintained currently by the Department as a basis for reports on old-age assistance to the Federal Social Security Board.

Steps are already under way to obtain from the county offices the further information, covering all types of assistance, requested in the resolution. Since citizenship has not been a requirement for assistance eligibility, either in the law or in regulations, collection of the facts will involve field investigation in those cases where necessary information is not contained in the case records.

It will require approximately 1 month for the county offices to complete the information on citizenship, forward it to this office, and for a State-wide report to be tabulated and transmitted to the senate. Sincerely yours,

HOWARD L. RUSSELL,

Secretary.

Aliens receiving old-age assistance who, at date of acceptance, had not applied for

citizenship-January 1939

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Source: Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Public Assistance, Mar. 16, 1939.

(Printer's No.--30]

THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF PENNSYLVANIA, SESSION OF 1939, SENATE BILL

No. 134

Mr. Geltz, in place, February 28, 1939. Mr. Heyburn, Labor and Industry, March 14, 1939. As amended on second reading in Senate, March 21, 1939

[Insert in Italics; (S) Indicates Amendments Made on Floor of Senate) (AN ACT Requiring aliens to register with the Department of Labor and Industry and to carry and upon proper demand to exhibit identification cards prohibiting the issuing of certain registrations and licenses to or the employment of aliens under certain cicumstances and prescribing penalties)

The General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania hereby enacts as follows:

SECTION 1. On or before the first day of January, one thousand nine hundred and forty, and during the month of December of the year one thousand nine hundred and thirty-nine, and of each year thereafter, every alien eighteen (18) years or over residing in this Commonwealth who has not declared his or her intention to become an American citizen shall register with the Department of Labor and Industry on forms to be prescribed and furnished by the department and every such alien becoming a resident of this Commonwealth after the first day of January, one thousand nine hundred and forty, shall in like manner register with the department within thirty days after becoming such resident. Such registration shall show the name, age, address, occupation, name of employer, characteristics of appearance, name of wife or husband if any of such alien member, names and ages of all children under eighteen (18) residing with him or her and if not his or her own, the names of their

parents, and such other information and details as the department shall direct.

Sec. 2. For each original registration and for each annual registration thereafter the person registered shall pay to the department a registration fee of five dollars ($5.00) and shall receive an alien identification card which he or she shall carry at all times and shall exhibit upon demand by any police officer or agent of the Department of Labor and Industry displaying evidence of his authority.

SEC. 3. No motor vehicle shall be registered in the name of any alien nor shall any license to operate a motor vehicle or any liquor license or malt- or brewedbeverage license be issued to any alien unless such alien shall exhibit an alien identification card for the current registration period.

SEC. 4. No person, copartnership, association, corporation, political subdivision, or the Commonwealth, or any of its agencies, shall employ any alien who is not registered and in possession of an alien identification card for the current period.

Any person, copartnership, association, or corporation, or any officer or agent of the Commonwealth or any of its political subdivisions, (8) knowingly and wilfully violating the provisions of this section shall upon summary conviction be sentenced to pay a fine of not more than one hundred dollars ($100.00) or in the case of individuals the members of copartnerships and associations and the officers of corporations to undergo imprisonment of not more than sixty (60) days, or both.

SEC. 5. The Department of Labor and Industry shall classify such registrations in such manner as shall best serve the purpose of ready reference and shall furnish a copy thereof to the Pennsylvania Motor Police. All such records shall be retained for a period of at least three years. The department shall have power to make and enforce rules and regulations to carry into effect and inforce the provisions of this Act.

Sec. 6. Every alien over the age of eighteen (18) who has not declared his or her intention to become an American citizen and who fails to register as provided in this Act within any of the periods required hereby shall upon summary conviction thereof be sentenced to pay a fine of not more than one hundred dollars ($100.00) or to undergo imprisonment for not more than sixty (60) days, or both.

Every alien required to be registered who shall fail to carry his or her alien identification card or who shall fail or refuse to exhibit the same when properly required to do so shall upon summary conviction thereof be sentenced to pay a fine of not more than ten dollars ($10.00) or to undergo imprisonment for not more than ten (10) days, or both.

Sec. 7. All Acts and parts of Acts inconsistent herewith are hereby repealed.

Senator REYNOLDS. And I would like to have a copy of that too, Mr. Chairman.

Mr. BRINSER. Bill No. 408, for the regulation of aliens, pertaining to registration, meets with the approval of the members of our organization who have no doubt it could not be successfully put into operation. I might say there is a bill now pending in the Legislature of Pennsylvania that would require an employer to keep a card index of all his employees, including the aliens, with a view to giving citizens preference.

The argument is made that if the alien refuses to get a license to drive an automobile, he would refuse to apply and register or do anything else that might be required. In fact, it is said that only law-abiding aliens, as was said yesterday, will register, and others

The others in time would have to, if they wanted to get anything or do anything at all. You might offer the same objection to requiring auto drivers to register, and that those who wanted to would get a license, and those who did not want to, would drive, anyhow, but it does not seem to be so. I think a plan under alien registration can better be worked out to catch the greater percentage of the aliens who come here illegally. It would help locate them. Under it they could be made to register or be deported as circumstances warrant. I don't think there is any more reason why such a law of the land cannot be enforced than the law of misdemeanors and crimes or any other law, instead of just simply saying that "well, a law-abiding citizen will do it, and those who won't abide by the law we just can't do anything about.".

I want to be brief. Last evening I attended a meeting in Philadelphia of approximately 500 American citizens who went on record endorsing and earnestly approving Senator Reynolds' bills, without a dissenting vote. I bring that to you as the general sentiment and wish of the people I come in contact with them and meet every day in my travels.

Senator STEWART. Do you know how many aliens are employed in industrial enterprises in Pennsylvania?

Mr. BRINSER. I do not, Senator, but I will try to get that information for Pennsylvania where I reside.

Senator STEWART. You could get that?
Mr. BRINSER. I believe I could.
Senator STEWART. From what source?

Mr. BRINSER. I believe I can get it from the Pennsylvania State Department of Labor and Industry. I believe they have it.

Senator HERRING. Who is your commissioner there?
Mr. BRINSER. Just now he is Hines—Commissioner Hines.
Senator HERRING. He is the one we want, then.

Mr. BRINSER. He has just been appointed by the new administration. I shall be very glad to try to get it, and I believe I can get it. If it is available, I will get it and send it to this committee.

Senator HERRING. We will be glad to have it.
Mr. BRINSER. I will be very glad to do that.
Senator HERRING. Thank you.
Senator REYNOLDS. I want to thank you, very much, Mr. Brinser.

Mr. BRINSER. You are quite welcome. That information is to be forwarded to Senator Reynolds?

Senator REYNOLDS. No; to the chairman.
Mr. BRINSER. To the chairman of the committee.

Senator REYNOLDS. But if you will be good enough to forward me a copy as well, because I am not a member of the committee, I would appreciate the courtesy. Mr. BRINSER. Yes.

Senator HERRING. We will see that you get copies of any of it, Senator.

(Witness excused.)

Senator REYNOLDS. Mr. Chairman, may I ask the Commissioner one question?

Senator HERRING. Yes, sir.
Senator REYNOLDS. A moment ago, Mr. Houghteling, you admitted

, that you were a director of the Foreign Language Information Service, of which Mr. Read .Lewis is a director. I want to ask you if your literature did not carry this, in asking that more aliens be admitted to this country and the aliens in this country be given every advantage that an American citizen is given, if your literature did not carry this statement under the slogan interpreting America to the immigrant" as follows:

Take a railroad train and go through the South, through the West, through the North and in the outlying sections of the country. Look at what we Americans call our own people, who have not had the advantages of the people in the big cities. You will see American people of the Nordic race. You will see people whose forefathers were here 300 years ago. But you will see them in the lowest state of civilization, that is, you will see them in distress, and you will see them unkempt and uneducated and uncouth.

I will ask you if the organization of which you are a director did not issue that?

Mr. HOUGHTELING. I don't know; I am not familiar with that.

Senator REYNOLDS. Do you remember when Mr. Read Lewis testified over in the House in regard to some immigration laws?

Mr. HougHTELING. When was that?
Senator REYNOLDS. Year before last.

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Mr. HOUGHTELING. No; I was not commissioner at that time.
Senator REYNOLDS. All right. Have we anybody else here?
Mr. Patten. Yes; I am here, Senator.

Senator HERRING. Senator, you are referring to the literature of this organization; not of the Department?

Senator REYNOLDS. Oh, no; the organization of which our Immigration Commissioner is a director, the Foreign Language Information Service, Inc., of 222 Fourth Avenue, New York City.

Senator HERRING. Yes; that is it.
Mr. HouGHTELING. Yes; that was in it.

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STATEMENT OF JAMES H. PATTEN, WASHINGTON, D. C., REPRE

SENTING THE COMMANDERY GENERAL, SONS OF AMERICA; THE IMMIGRATION RESTRICTION LEAGUE, INC.; THE NEW YORK STATE COUNCIL OF THE JUNIOR ORDER OF UNITED AMERICAN MECHANICS; THE FRATERNAL PATRIOTIC AMERICANS; THE PATRIOTIC CIVIC AMERICAN ALLIANCE; THE AMERICAN CITIZENSHIP FOUNDATION; AND THE GENERAL BOARD OF PATRIOTIC SOCIETIES

Senator REYNOLDS. While I am on that, will you be good enough to begin your statement and refer to that, Mr. Patten.

Mr. PATTEN. My name is James H. Patten, Washington, D. C., representing the commandery general, Sons of America; the Immigration Restriction League, Inc.; the New York State Council of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics, Inc., which is not affiliated with the national council represented by Mr. Wilmeth_this morning; and I also represent the Fraternal Patriotic Americans, Inc.; the Patriotic Civic American Alliance, Inc.; the American Citizenship Foundation, Inc.; and the General' Executive Board of Patriotic Societies.

Senator HERRING. You live in Washington now? Mr. PATTEN. I am in Washington some of the time. I was born in Kansas.

Senator HERRING. You are their paid représentative?

Mr. PATTEN. I receive no compensation from any of those organizations and have not for several years. And if you will permit me just a moment to explain the origin of my interest in the immigration question, that the question as to salary seems to me to require. Left an orphan, I managed to work my way at Harvard for 9 years after receiving a fellowship of $450 the first year wben I graduated from Kansas State University in 1896, becoming later an instructor and Austin teaching fellow. While at Harvard, for 17 months, I was a streetcar conductor, No. 2171, working the first two summers and also spare time. When Professor Taussig broke down in the fall of 1901 I took over part of the lectures in economics 6, or the economic history of the United States, and devoted for the first time 2 weeks' lectures to immigration and its economic effects.

The origin of my interest in immigration was due to what I thought I saw occurring in New England as compared with the West. I was impressed by the destruction of local self-government, the undermining of wages and working conditions, for instance, in Boston, for which city the legislature had to create a finance commission, ap

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