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With the best available data, with checks from the reports of both the Division of Migration and the Stateman's Year Book, the following tables for the principal emigrant-sending and immigrant-receiving nations are compiled: A. Principal emigrant-exporting countries for which data are available for 1922 or

1923

Country

Emigration

Immigra- Net loss by tion

migration

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1. Austria (1923).. 2. Belgium (1922). 3. Bermudas (1922) 4. Czechoslovakia (1923). 5. Danzig (1922) 6. Denmark (1922). 7. Finland (1922). 8. Germany (1922). 9. Great Britain and Northern Ireland (1922). 10. Hungary (1922). 11. Italy (1922). 12. Japan (1922) 13. Netherlands (1923) 14. Norway (1923). 15. Poland (1922) 16. Roumania (1923). 17. Spain (1922) 18. Sweden (1922) 19. Switzerland (1923) 20. Yugoslavia (1923).

• 32, 115

17 13 1 2 4,094 125, 715 2 3 36, 527 1 ? 174, 096

11, 701 1244, 440

17, 616 1 2 6, 930 1 18, 287 * 68, 243 420, 660 163, 512 311, 797 1 28, 006 1 2 9, 370

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1 Overseas only. Data from Migration Movements of the International Labor Office.

Data on immigration not recorded. * Statesman's Year Book, 1924. - Overseas and continental. Data from Migration Movements of the International Labor Office.

B. Principal immigrant-receiving countries for which data are available for 1920,

1921, 1922, or 1923

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Of course the tables which are desired would call for data for each of the world's primary governmental establishments, whether sovereign nations, dominions, or colonies, in reference to all of their emigration by calendar years, classified as to country of destination; similarly, all data on immigration, classified as to country of source; the usual subclassifications of age, sex, occupation, religion, race, family, social and economic values are desired, but such complete data are not possible until the different nations and colonies pay more attention to their own bookkeeping in human migration.

International understanding and the promotion of peace and good will among nations depend, among other things, upon the publication of facts in reference to human migrations. It can not be doubted but that the Division of Migration of the International Labor Office will take an active interest in compiling and analyzing reports as fast as individual nations and colonies will issue them.

In this connection reference should be made to the publication of the International Labor Office, entitled “Emigration and Immigration Legislation and Treaties” published in Geneva in 1922. This book analyzes the existing laws and treaties under the following titles:

Part I. Legislation concerning emigration.
Part II. Legislation concerning immigration.
Part III. International agreements concerning emigration and immigration.

These statistical and legal source materials are of great value, and the division of migration of the International Labor Office, in preparing and maintaining this compilation, performs a service of great value to both emigrant-sending and immigrant-receiving nations, and also to the cause of world peace.

(c) PROPOSED CONFERENCE OF IMMIGRANT-RECEIVING NATIONS 1. Purpose.-To define more clearly than has yet been done the causes and consequences of human migration, and to agree upon the common rights, duties, interests, and policies of the immigrant-receiving nation, while recognizing the full rights of the emigrant-sending nations to control their own emigration.

2. Call.—The call for a conference of this sort could be issued properly by any of the principal immigrant-receiving nations.

3. Participants. --- Nations logically eligible to participate in such a conference are all of the principal immigrant-receiving countries. (See pp. 1432 and 1434.)

4. Time.-On account of the unsettled state of the several national policies in reference to human migration, a conference of the several immigrant-receiving nations, as preliminary to a general migration conference of all nations, both emigrant-sending and immigrant-receiving, properly could be held to advantage within the year 1925. • 5. Place. Any of the capitals or central cities of any of the principal participating nations.

6. Agenda.In any conference of immigrant-receiving nations the agenda would fall naturally under two general heads:

First, the scientific study of human migration, which would cover an historical, economic, social, geographical, and racial analysis of human migrations of the past, and would seek to elucidate, more clearly than has been done heretofore, the causes and conditions which control human migration, and its consequences in reference to population numbers and race, and to economic, social, and political affairs. Such a study should provide the sound basis for the establishment of wise policies by the immigrant-receiving nations.

Logically, the second part of a conference of this sort would be devoted to a discussion and agreement on the common rights, duties, interests, and policies of the immigrant-receiving nations.

(D) PROPOSED AGENDA The following themes are offered, tentatively, as proper subjects for consideration by a conference of immigrant-receiving countries:

1. Collection and analysis of scientific data on the causes and consequences of human migration. (Appendix J, p. 1425.)

2. Classification and definition of different types of persons who travel or migrate from one nation to another.

3. Rights and duties of emigrant-exporting nations, in particular relation to the immigrant-receiving nations.

(a) Expatriation, naturalization, dual citizenship.
(6) Control by the emigrant-sending nation of her nationals in foreign

countries. (c) Exiling and encouraging emigration of undesirables. 4. Rights and duties of immigrant-receiving nations, under international law, as historically developed and presently practiced. 5. Common interests of all nations in human migration.

Prospect of future populations of the several nations in the world, by racial type and geographical distribution, with particular reference to migration forces. 7. National welfare of immigrant-receiving nations. (a) Near future settlement, and industrial and commercial development.

Industrial consequences. (6) Recruiting of population by assimilable races and selected family strains

of acceptable inborn physical, mental, and moral qualities. Racial

and family stock consequences. 8. Common policies of immigrant-receiving nations.

429241-SER 5A

INDEX

Page
iens debarred..

1392
lien seamen..

1405, 1423
merican race.

1293
merican consuls and the immigration service.

1234, 1249
nalysis of the immigration act of 1924, by John B. Trevor.

1412
-sylum ideal...

1236
biological basis of migration.

1237, 1268, 1307
British dominions.

1260
Cable Act, the---

1395
Canadian immigration problems.-

1258
Carnegie Institution of Washington.

1231
Chinese exclusion..

1237
Clean bill of health..

1251
Commission for immigration study -

1307
Commissioner General of Immigration, report of, 1924..

1383
Commissioner General of Naturalization, report of, 1923.

1393
Conference by immigrant-receiving nations, proposed.

1425, 1429, 1433
Conference, future, proposed by Rome Conference-

1374
Conference on emigration, Rome, 1924.

1289, 1367
Contiguous territory, entry from .

1404
Control of nationals in foreign lands.-

1303, 1373
Cost of alien insane.--

1276
Cost of examination of emigrants in their home territories.

1274
Country of origin.--

1368
Criminalistic foreign born.

1323, 1326, 1333
Criticisms of the "Melting Pot” study.

1311, 1340
Declaration of would-be immigrant.-

1269
Definition of an immigrant-

1285, 1372, 1398
Definition of nationality.

1402
Definitions in 1924 act..

1398, 1408, 1413
Department of Labor.

1231, 1234, 1250, 1275
Department of State.

1234, 1250, 1275
Deportation...

1261, 1286, 1379, 1393, 1404
Deserting alien seamen.

1378
Desirability of immigrant, test of.

1265, 1349
Dillingham Commission..

1237, 1307
Economic basis of migration.

1236
Economic conditions in Europe.

1238
Emigrant-exporting countries.

1430, 1432
Emigration causes.

1240, 1425
Emigration from the United States, 1924.

1385
Emigration right.

1242, 1373
English language and the New York State constitution..

1296
Equality of treatment.

1374
European field studies in immigration.

1233
Examination of twould-be immigrants.

1252, 1263, 1267, 1349
Exclusion from United States..

1403, 1419
Expatriation, international law of.

1286
Exporter of emigrants, Europe as an..

1239
Family history of immigrants.

1265, 1343
Family stock standards

1261
Fecundity, national..

1297
Feeble-minded, the.

1324, 1327
Filtering the immigrant stream.

1262
Foreign born, color and age of.

1323
Foreign born in American institutions.

1319
German emigration freedom..

1248
Hawaii, population change in.

1305

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Page
Immigrant, definition of an.

1285, 1372, 1398
Immigrant-receiving nations...

1260, 1339, 1432
Immigrant-receiving nations, further research and proposed conference
by

1429, 1433
Immigration act of 1924.

1397
Immigration agent to Europe.

1231
Immigration authority in United States governmental departments 1248
Immigration standards..

1277
Immigration to the United States, 1924.

1383
Immigration to the United States, total, 1820–1923.

1380
Importer of immigrants, United States as an.-

1239
Increase and decrease by races, due to arrival and departure of aliens in
United States, 1924.-

1391
Insane, the...

1325, 1329
International law and the immigrant-receiving nations.

1429
International law in relation to human migration.

1285
Italian decalogue.-

1303
Italian emigration..

1240, 1244, 1264
Italian emigration control.

1247
Japanese exclusion.

1419
Jewish immigration.

1253
League of Nations, the division of migration of the..

1287, 1375
“Melting Pot” survey-

1312
Mental tests...

1273, 1278
Mental tests, comparative.-

1280
Military invasion and invasion by immigration.

1305
Nationality, definition of

1402
Nativity of foreign-born insane..

1314, 1321
Natural intelligence..

1278, 1280
Natural qualities of immigrants..

1272
Naturalization by military certificates.-

1393
Naturalization certificates, issued and denied, 1923

1394
Naturalization court decisions.

1395
Naturalization, international law of..

1286
New York State expenditure on alien insane.

1276
Nonquota immigrants.

1398
Northwestern Europe, immigration from.

1381
Numerical limitations after 1927...

1401, 1417
Oriental immigration..

1378
Pan America an immigrant-receiving group of nations.

1260
Penalty for illegal transportation.-

1405
Policies of the United States...

1236
Population growth and immigration.---

1295
Population of the United States, study of the, by John B. Trevor.

1361
Preferences within quotas..-

1398
Presidential quota proclamation, 1924.

1410
Presidential statement.

1409
Propaganda, foreign...

1300, 1303
Proposed conference by immigrant-receiving nations.-

1310, 1429, 1433
Proposed research in immigration.-

1429
Public Health Service, United States.

1234, 1251, 1275
Quota formulas, comparative-

1290
Quota immigrants...

1398
Quotas by nationalities, under law of 1924.

1401, 1410
Race-Biology, Swedish State Institute for.

1232
Reentry to United States..

1400
Research in immigration.

1308, 1425
Revenue, from immigration.

1276, 1380
Rules and regulations...

1406
Rumania

1301
Scientific study of immigration.

1425
Secretary of Labor, report of, 1923.

1377
Selection of immigrants abroad..

1274, 1414
Selective immigration, experimental studies in.

1343
Smuggling and surreptitious entry-

1378
Socially inadequate, the.

1334

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