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9. Aliens debarred from entering the United States and aliens deported after landing

during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1924, by races or peoples

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10. Aliens debarred from entering the United States during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1924, by causes

Number • Insanity, epilepsy

85 Idiots, imbeciles, and feeble-minded..

105 Constitutional psychopathic inferiority.

69 Chronic alcoholism...

5 Surgeon's certificate of mental defect which may affect alien's ability to

earn a living. Applicable to cases other than idiots, imbeciles, feebleminded, epileptics, and insane..

41 Tuberculosis (noncontagious)-

9 Loathsome or dangerous contagious diseases.

1, 486 Surgeon's certificate of physical defect which may affect alien's ability to earn a living, other than loathsome or dangerous contagious diseases

706 Likely to become a public charge

8, 130 Paupers, professional beggars, and vagrants.

6 Contract laborers.

1, 219 Assisted aliens..

325 Stowaways.Accompanying aliens (under sec. 18)

251 Under 16 years of age and unaccompanied by parent.

267 Polygamists

2 Criminals.

546 Anarchists.

2 Prostitutes and aliens coming for any immoral purpose.

163 Aliens who are supported by or receive proceeds of prostitution..

1 Aliens who procure or attempt to bring in prostitutes or females for any immoral purpose

149 Had been deported within one year.

46 Unable to read (over 16 years of age)

1, 708 Geographically excluded classes.Under passport provisions of sec. 3.

8 Under provisions of Chinese exclusion act.

509 Under last proviso of sec. 23..

322 Without proper passport under State Department regulations.

1, 554 Under per cent limit act of May 19, 1921, as extended “excess quota".

10, 114 Total..

30, 284

2, 436

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11. Aliens deported from the United States after landing, during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1924, by causes

Number Insanity, epilepsy -

612 Imbeciles, feeble-minded.

19 Constitutional psychopathic inferiority

57 Other mental conditions.--

36 Loathsome or dangerous contagious diseases..

101 Professional beggars.

3 Likely to become a public charge. Public charges not specified.

52 Entered without inspection.

605 Contract laborers..

54 Accompanying aliens (under sec. 18).

3 Assisted aliens...

12 Under 16 years of age and unaccompanied by parent.

26 Stowaways.

16 Polygamist. Criminals.

525 Anarchists, and violations of war-time legislation..

81 Prostitutes and aliens coming for any immoral purpose.

106 Supported by or received the proceeds of prostitution..

3 Aliens who procure or attempt to bring in prostitutes or females for any immoral purpose.---

88 Prostitutes after entry or inmates of houses of prostitution.

80 Imports or attempts to import or assists or protects or promises to protect prostitutes from arrest..

5 Received proceeds of prostitution or connected with the house of prostitution or other place habitually frequented by prostitutes--

44 Found in the United States after having been deported as a prostitute or

procurer or as having been connected with the business of prostitution.

13 Entered the United States within one year of previous deportation.

190 Unable to read (over 16 years of age)

345 Under passport provisions of sec. 3.

44 Geographically excluded classes..

53 Under provisions of Chinese exclusion act..

1 172 Without proper passport (under State Department regulations)

218 Under last proviso of sec. 23.--

270 Under provisions of narcotic act..

21 Under per cent limit act of May 19, 1921, as extended “ excess quota' 462 Total....

6, 409

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(c) From the report of the Commissioner of Naturalization for the year ending

June 30, 1923

1. Military certificates of naturalization (pp. 8–9).-Seven thousand one hundred and nine aliens who served in the American military or naval forces during the World War and received honorable discharge certificates were naturalized under a special provision of law by which certain exemptions accrued by reason of such service, brings the grand total of aliens naturalized since May 9, 1918, upon the basis of military or naval service during the war, up to 278,513.

It may be recalled that the Provost Marshal General estimated that 400,000 aliens were drafted into the United States Army for service during the World War, and it is interesting to note that almost 70 per cent of these men who entered the service as subjects of foreign powers have since been clothed with American citizenship. Of the remaining 30 per cent, undoubtedly many were killed in battle or have returned to their native countries to reside permanently, thus reducing still further the percentage that might otherwise be candidates for citizenship.

1 Chinese deported under judicial writ not included.

429-241-SER 5A- 12

2. Certificates of naturalization, exclusive of military naturalizations, issued and denied, by naturalization districts, Alaska and Hawaii, with

reasons for denials, fiscal year ended June 30, 1923 (p. 10)

Certificates denied and reasons therefor

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1,948

3 655 53 16 21

3 12, 468 2 1 1, 109

2 288

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57
351
298

58
148
366
284
54
82
164
208

Boston.
New York
Philadelphia
Washington, D. C.
Pittsburgh
Chicago
St. Louis.
St. Paul..
Denver
San Francisco.
Seattle
Alaska
Hawaii.

32
64
10

8
10
19
24
45

2
10
13

453
591
28
21
39
143
68
31

2
35
56

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48 82 158 50 97 42 71 16 19 32 66

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29 49 32 17 47 60 23 29 11 21 13

821
849
355

249
1,758

727
312
392
120
467
279

1
1

7
28
64
17
21

8
22
9

4,058
4, 867
2,068

748
3, 149
3, 727
1, 545
1, 408

640
1, 577
1,092

2

33 7 4 23 49

14,379
33, 432
18, 370

3,899
22, 610
24, 557
5, 111
6,480
1, 577
3, 919
3,268

221
152

866
1, 316
5 640
6 677
7 336
6740
9 315

10 1

18,437
38, 299
20, 438

4, 647
25, 759
28, 284
6, 656
7,888

217
5, 496

360
223
155

12

22 13 10 16 12 13 23 18 29 28 25 0.9 2

10

20 13

3 4

1

1

3

Total.

114

907

2,070

237

1,467

96

1, 601

142

682

6, 331

188

331

14

10, 704

24, 884

137, 975 162, 859

15

Naturalization district

Already
a citi-
zen

Im- Incom- Insuffimoral petent cient char- wit

resi-
acter nesses dence

No cer-
Igno- tificate
rance

of ar-
rival

Decla-
ration
invalid

Certifi

cates
granted

Unable
Want

to pro-
of duce De-
prose- witness ceased
cution or dep-

osition

No Peti-
juris- tioner :'s
dic- motion
tion

Mis-
cella-
neous

Sec.
2169

Total

1 2,458 denied on account of unfavorable draft status.
2 272 denied on account of unfavorable draft status.
3 695 denied on account of unfavorable draft status.
41,203 denied on account of unfavorable draft status.
6 573 denied on account of unfavorable draft status.

6 646 denied on account of unfavorable draft status.
7 287 denied on account of disloyalty.
6 675 denied on account of being slackers.
$315 denied on account of unfavorable draft status.
101 denied on account of disloyalty.

3. Aliens (civilian and military) admitted to citizenship during the fiscal year ended

June 30, 1923, arranged by nationalities

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The preceding table (No. 2, p. 1394) shows that out of a total of 162,859 petitions for naturalization disposed of by the courts during the fiscal year just ended, 24,884 were denied or rejected for the various causes enumerated. Reference has been made in an earlier part of this report to the plan devised for preventing rejections on jurisdictional grounds, and further elaboration appears unnecessary except to suggest that it will be interesting to await returns of the current fiscal year for comparative purposes under the new system.

4. Court decisions (p. 11).--The past year has witnessed adjudications by the United States Supreme Court of two cases which have a very important bearing on the administration of the naturalization statutes. It is a matter of coincidence that these two decisions called for construction of the same statute, namely, section 2169 of the Revised Statutes, which limits the grant of naturalization, among others, to aliens who are '« white persons.'

The cases in point are Takao Ozawa v. United States and United States v. Bhagat Singh Thind, which involved, respectively, the eligibility of members of the Japanese and Hindu races for naturalization. The Supreme Court decided that neither of these races constitutes “white persons" within the contemplation of section 2169 of the Revised Statutes, thereby settling issues which had been more or less mooted since the enactment of the limiting statute in question.

It is always a source of gratification to administrative officers to procure final determination of legal questions by the highest court in the land, irrespective of whether such determination supports or rejects a previously reached administrative construction. Such final adjudications serve to clarify the atmosphere of doubt hitherto existing in the interpretation of statutes and render less difficult the administrative path and harmonizes the varying rules in courts of original jurisdiction. This is particularly true with respect to our naturalization laws because of the constitutional mandate upon Congress to “provide an uniform rule of naturalization.” This bureau regards as one of its necessary functions the duty of having disputed issues arising in connection with the naturalization laws carried up to the Supreme Court of the United States for final authoritative interpretation, and it deems any renditions by that tribunal on naturalization questions a milestone in the progress toward uniformity.

5. The Cable Act.-One of the most interesting legislative developments of the past year, from the standpoint of naturalization and citizenship, was the enactment of September 22, 1922, commonly known as the Cable Act.

Stated broadly, the purpose of this law was to remove the marriage state from the field of operation of our naturalization and citizenship laws. Under the Cable Act, marriage after September 22, 1922, does not operate to confer citizenship upon an alien woman whose husband was then or subsequently becomes a citizen; neither does such marriage forfeit citizenship in the case of a woman citizen who marries an alien husband unless the latter is of the class ineligible for naturalization. Citizenship of a woman forfeited by marriage to an alien prior to September 22, 1922, may be regained by simplified naturalization proceedings; and the marriage state no longer constitutes an obstacle to the naturalization, by separate and independent proceedings, of an alien woman married to an alien husband, if he himself is not barred.

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