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though we may inadvertently err, our 6rature and impartial deliberation, and tha: ** ise in the disappointment we may occasion eral plan of the work we have no wish to war x space is extended, we shall be happy to act me cially calculated to interest and edify the youte 11.96 ch, provided they have reference, more or less 245/" s'of the world towards just views in natural areal We are of opinion that the communications in geral ssess a character, which, if it would not exclude them from Ulications, would at least but rarely be found there. When on the views of other denominations of Christians are made, our contributors will, as far as possible, avoid whatever is ed to give offence, either in matter or in manner, and devote lergies not so much to the destruction of error, as to the advo: the truth; for the best means of dispersing darkness is to exght. 2 respectfully solicit early and authentic reports of the proceed. and meetings of the various Societies and Institutions, notices of s in the press, and information of every kind that will prove initing to the church at large. We shall also be glad to bara su ntion directed to modern or other publications, contado ays t may serve to illustrate or corroborate the views 10 9:57 urch. As the interests of the work have suffered from the kar Jaromis a hich it has sometimes been supplied to the banks.... der to prevent a recurrence of the inconveniesz. *. Mrror 13,7 ur friends, that their papers should be sent to her i nonth ; and that information of a temporary 23. 24. tu tu the sertion, should be sent, at the latest, by the Bri

SEKEUR

H butik
December <39.

use of

The Intellectual Repository, although, comparatively, of limited circulation, has long possessed a respectable character, even in a literary point of view; while, in reference to the subjects discussed in its pages, no other similar work could compare with it, either for the soundness of its principles—in harmony both with enlightened reason and the Word of God,-or for its cheering and consistent views of the eternal world.

The period has arrived when the Lord has indeed, and even in the apprehension of all reflecting men, begun to “make all things new,” and to establish His church on a lasting foundation; but, in the allwise workings of his providence, he graciously condescends to make

means, at times, to all appearance, the most insignificant, to accomplish his great purpose—the eternal blessedness of his rational creatures ; and no one can doubt that, among these means, the Intellectual Repository is destined to perform an important, if not a prominent part.

Many of the members of the New Church are possessed of talents in abundance, from the exercise of which they may at once derive unalloyed satisfaction, and confer lasting, yea, eternal benefit, on their differently gifted brethren. We trust then, that our friends of literary attainments will see the propriety of affording us their cordial support in our labors. A wide range of subject lies open before them: the worlds of matter and of mind; the concerns of time and of eternity; science in all its ramifications; in a word, “things new and old.”

The Magazine too is often the only vehicle by which the sincere seeker after truth, or the novitiate recipient, can have his doubts removed, and his difficulties explained. We would also wish to encourage, rather than check, the attempts of young writers; and for this purpose would devote a portion of the work to their contributions.

While we anticipate a high degree of pleasure from the honorable post we are thus called upon to fill, we are sensible we must not expect it to be of an unmixed character. Our principal duty will be to decide which of the materials supplied to us shall be published. This we will do to the best of our judgement, earnestly looking to the Lord to guide us aright, and keeping steadily in view the one object, which, we doubt not, most of our contributors regard as sincerely as ourselves—the prosperity of the New Church, individually and collectively. It will, however, occasionally happen, that we shall feel bound to reject, -as containing matter that we fear would lead to unprofitable controversy, or that from some other cause is objectionable, what may, nevertheless, have been written with the best intentions; in such case, we must request our friends to bear with us; assuring them, that, although we may inadvertently err, our decision will be the result of mature and impartial deliberation, and that we shall not fail to sympathise in the disappointment we may occasion.

In the general plan of the work we have no wish to innovate. As, however, our space is extended, we shall be happy to admit some varieties, especially calculated to interest and edify the youth belonging to the church, provided they have reference, more or less directly, to the progress 'of the world towards just views in natural and spiritual science. We are of opinion that the communications in general should possess a character, which, if it would not exclude them from other publications, would at least but rarely be found there. When remarks on the views of other denominations of Christians are made, we trust our contributors will, as far as possible, avoid whatever is calculated to give offence, either in matter or in manner, and devote their energies not so much to the destruction of error, as to the advocacy of the truth; for the best means of dispersing darkness is to exhibit light.

We respectfully solicit early and authentic reports of the proceedings and meetings of the various Societies and Institutions, notices of books in the press, and information of every kind that will prove

interesting to the church at large. We shall also be glad to have our attention directed to modern or other publications, containing passages that may serve to illustrate or corroborate the views of the New Church.

As the interests of the work have suffered from the late period at which it has sometimes been supplied to the booksellers, we wish, in order to prevent a recurrence of the inconvenience, to impress upon our friends, that their papers should be sent the first week in each month; and that information of a temporary nature, to secure its insertion, should be sent, at the latest, by the 20th.

J. H. SMITHSON,

H. BUTTER. December 9, 1839.

The Intellectual Repository, although, comparatively, of limited circulation, has long possessed a respectable character, even in a literary point of view; while, in reference to the subjects discussed in its pages, no other similar work could compare with it, either for the soundness of its principles—in harmony both with enlightened reason and the Word of God, -or for its cheering and consistent views of the eternal world.

The period has arrived when the Lord has indeed, and even in the apprehension of all reflecting men, begun to “make all things new,” and to establish His church on a lasting foundation; but, in the allwise workings of his providence, he graciously condescends to make use of means, at times, to all appearance, the most insignificant, to accomplish his great purpose—the eternal blessedness of his rational creatures; and no one can doubt that, among these means, the Intellectual Repository is destined to perform an important, if not a prominent part.

Many of the members of the New Church are possessed of talents in abundance, from the exercise of which they may at once derive unalloyed satisfaction, and confer lasting, yea, eternal benefit, on their differently gifted brethren. We trust then, that our friends of literary attainments will see the propriety of affording us their cordial support in our labors. A wide range of subject lies open before them: the worlds of matter and of mind; the concerns of time and of eternity; science in all its ramifications; in a word, “things new and old.”

The Magazine too is often the only vehicle by which the sincere seeker after truth, or the novitiate recipient, can have his doubts removed, and his difficulties explained. We would also wish to encourage, rather than check, the attempts of young writers; and for this purpose would devote a portion of the work to their contributions.

While we anticipate a high degree of pleasure from the honorable post we are thus called upon to fill, we are sensible we must not expect it to be of an unmixed character. Our principal duty will be to decide which of the materials supplied to us shall be published. This we will do to the best of our judgement, earnestly looking to the Lord to guide us aright, and keeping steadily in view the one object, which, we doubt not, most of our contributors regard as sincerely as ourselves—the prosperity of the New Church, individually and collectively. It will, however, occasionally happen, that we shall feel bound to reject, -as containing matter that we fear would lead to unprofitable controversy, or that from some other cause is objectionable,

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