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A gentleman, in his report on the condition of England, national pictures nor at the international fish on the says that "in one small village the Lord of the Manor had | Sabbath-day-we beg pardon, we mean Sunday, their 200 acres, and no other inhabitant had a single acre left. lordships having overcome all scruples in respect of SaturThe manorial estate had absorbed all theirs, and the little day-knowing full well that he is too much occupied to community had been reduced by this means from prosperity , snatch a glimpse of them on the other days of the week, to poverty.”

unless he is sufficiently his own master to keep the institu

tion of St. Monday, by sticking to his work on Sunday, Should not the English labourer le grateful? In some

and taking his holiday on the second day of the week parts he has nearly as much for his maintenance as it costs instead of the first. to feed a pauper in the workhouse, and yet he grumbles.

There appears to be a strange disagreement in high

“without the “ In inany villages,” says Mr Stuart, “I saw handsome places. Sir Hardinge Giffard maintains, European houses, surrounded by gardens, vineyards, and slightest fear of contradiction," that Christianity is part

of the common law of this kingdom. Lord Coleridge says well-stocked farms, and invariably the natives told me that these properties belonged to money-lenders, who had

that “it is no longer true that Christianity is part of the become possessed of them by degrees, adding field to field

law of the land." Forty years ago Thomas Carlyle mainthrough the instrumentality of the mixed tribunals."

tained that the kingdom had been atheistic since the accession of Charles II.

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are based on truth, which is great and must prevail,

UNCONSIDERED TRIFLES. we shall be able to advance them with a force that will gain from calm strength of conviction much

"The Conservative party have lately started a more than it will lose by the absence of the energy magazine and a big club. No doubt they expeot great of despair. If we think that the faults and vices things to result from: this exhibition of energy, but they

are doomed to disappointment. They are merely adding of our poorer or more ignorant brothers are almost a dah of fresh paint to a rotten structure." These are the

words of Lord Dunraven. Not the least remarkable wholly the result of vicious conditions of life, our

feature, however, in the formation of the new club is its belief in the absolute equality and brotherhood of It professes to be “constitutional," and yet the

names which guarantee that quality are the names of men rich and poor, of wise and weak, will force us to ex

who have for three years succeeded in violating the first tend pity to the peer whose pride ruins a province, principles of the Constitution by sheer physical force, as well as to the peasant whose folly desolates a degrading the House of Representatives to the level of a

depriving a large constituency of its electoral rights, and home. In separating the sinner from the sin, our love for the man will not make our voice tremble

The outrage at Monte Carlo which nonscinnad on much

name.

racecourse,

A gentleman, in his report on the condition of England, national pictures nor at the international fish on the says that “in one small village the Lord of the Manor had | Sabbath-day-we beg pardon, we mean Sunday, their 200 acres, and no other inhabitant had a single acre left. lordships having overcome all scruples in respect of SaturThe manorial estate had absorbed all theirs, and the little day-knowing full well that he is too much occupied to community had been reduced by this means from prosperity, snatch a glimpse of them on the other days of the week, to poverty.”

i unless he is sufficiently his own master to keep the institu

| tion of St. Monday, by sticking to his work on Sunday, Should not the English labourer le grateful? In some

and taking his holiday on the second day of the week parts he has nearly as much for his maintenance as it costs instead of the first. to feed a pauper in the workhouse, and yet he grumbles.

There appears to be a strange disagreement in high “ In inany villages,” says Mr Stuart, “I saw handsome places. Sir Hardinge Giffard maintains, “ without the European houses, surrounded by gardens, vineyards, and slightest fear of contradiction," that Christianity is part well-stocked farms, and invariably the natives told me

of the common law of this kingdom. Lord Coleridge says that these properties belonged to money-lenders, who had

that “it is no longer true that Christianity is part of the become possessed of them by degrees, adding field to field

law of the land.” Forty years ago Thomas Carlyle mainthrough the instrumentality of the mixed tribunals."

tained that the kingdom had been atheistic since the accession of Charles II.

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"In many villages,” says our English reporter “I saw Woe unto you that make a few rich to make many handsome houses surrounded by gardens, orchards, and ! poor ! Woe unto you that make merchandise out of the well-stocked farms, and invariably the natives told me needs of your brethren ! Woe unto you who on the that these properties belonged to the Squire, who had hustings and the platform fall down and humble yourbecome possessed of them by degrees, adding field to field selves that the congregation of the poor may fall into the through the instrumentality of enclosure Acts, and a pro- hands of your leaders. Woe unto you, for God the Father cess of forestalling his poorer neighbours.”

of All is against you, God the Son, the poor man of

Nazareth, is against you, God the Holy Spirit, who cannot The English labourer should be congratulated that he lie, is against you !-C. Kingsley. was not born in Egypt, but in a land where labour is the sole title to prosperity, where only the idle starve, and the industrious never lack for work which will repay them

The picturesque little town of Bakewell, in Derbyshire, sufficient to enable them to live as good citizens.

has a population of about 2,500. It has also 14 publichouses. The town is entirely owned by one man, whose

agent carries on the business of a brever in a neighbouring At a meeting of the Junior Clerical Society of London

town. We leave these facts to speak for themselves to last week, Canon Shuttleworth read a paper on

“ Chris

our temperance friends. The Land Question and the tian Socialism.” The paper was well received by the clergy, Drink Question are more closely allied than would appear and no opposition was offered to the Socialism advocated. at first sight. This is a very hopeful sign, for we feel sure that nothing but Socialism united with Christianity can mend the evils of society. If the clergy will speak out from their pulpits, A well-known unorthodox preacher was travelling with and declare in the presence of their rich churchwardens, as a little girl, and by way of making himself pleasant, he we heard one the other day, that “to start in life with the asked if she were a good little girl. She replied, “I am not object of making a fortune was absolutely unlawful for a good girl, but I am a Christian Socialist, a Catholic any baptized person,” Christian Socialism will move apace,

Democrat, and a life-long teetotaller.” If many of the and the Church will gain many more adherents than the rising generation have been taught to make a like declarafew rich men she will lose who are unable to bear these tion of faith, and to act it out in their lives, the future of “hard sayings. The difficulty which is discussed at each England is very hopeful. Church Congress without much effect, how to gain the masses, would quickly be solved, and again the

“ The refusal of the Irish labourers and servant girls to hear the Gospel" gladly.”

forget Ireland is nothing but the puerile foible of a half

educated race.”Daily Telegraph, May 11, 1883. All systems of society which favour the accumulation of capital in a few hands, which oust the masses from the

There was a time when we ignorantly imagined that soil which their forefathers possessed of old, which reduce remembrance by the alien in far distant lands, was the

the love of the fatherland, cherished perennially in them to the level of serfs and day labourers living on wages and alms, which crush them down with debt, or in Daily Telegraph apprises us of our mistake, and inculcates

sweetest sentiment that could inspire the human soul. Our anywise degrade or enslave them, or deny them a permanent stake in the commonwealth, are contrary to the king aloud that British invaders have written the name of

a purer form of patriotiem. To sit at home and rejoice dom of God which Jesus proclaimed.-C. KINGSLEY.

England on the shifting sands of Egypt with the blood of

the hapless defenders of their country, in this, if we had The Rev. W. Harper, of Selby, has been very busy lately but the grace to see it, does true patriotism consist. But on the subject of reverence for betters," and the worship if an Irish girl looks back with love and longing upon the of pomp. He seems to take it for granted that those who land she has left, this, we learn at last, “is nothing but the occupy a high worldly position, notably noblemen and ! puerile foible of a half-educated race.” We acknowledge such like, are necessarily worthy of reverence. Human our teacher. The scales fall from our eyes. We join in equality,” says Mr. Harper, “is a dream, but if one must Professor Tyndall's giving of thanks, with but a slight be a dreamer, I would dream not that the tall man had variation of its theme of praise. “Thank God, we have their heads cut off, but that they grew much taller, and by our Daily Telegraph yet." some magic of brotherhood and sympathy drew up all other men to be tall, too, after their towering example.” Mr. Henry George will shortly issue a reply to the many

criticisms which his “ Progress and Porerty" has called On May 8th the Lords decided, by a very decent majo forth. It will be published by Mr. W. Reeves, Fleet-street rity, that the British workman should look neither at the 'London.

poor would

a

by overcrowding and filthy accommodation ; we want LAND REFORM UNION. country labourers who have seen their fathers and grand

fathers, after years of unremitting toil, sink into paupers' The following appeal has been issued by the graves; we want young men who wish that their sons and

daughters, at least, shall be delivered from the temptations Council of the Land Reform Union :

to which they and their sisters have been exposed in our For some months past, a few friends have been in the congested cities ; we want students who will tell the habit of meeting at each other's houses to discuss “ Progress people of England how landlordism has grown up, and and Poverty.' The more the book was discussed the

how it will inevitably overwhelm our civilisation in ruins, more apparent did it become that though some of Mr.

if it be not itself destroyed; we want landlords to prove George's side issues might be challenged, yet no argu

themselves men indeed, and to declare that their rights ment could be adduced which would invalidate his main shall not be in the people's wrong. Finally, we want conclusion, that to nationalise the land is absolutely just ministers of the Christian religion to declare to the people and necessary. It was determined, then, at a meeting on

that “the earth is the Lord's and the fulness thereof,' and the 16th April, that a public society should be formed that to all his children the All Father has given it. To with the object of diffusing such knowledge of the land declare, “Woe unto them that join house to house and lay question throughout the country as mighť tend to bring field to field till there be no place, that thoy may be placed Land Nationalisation within the range of practical politics. alone in the midst of the earth.” Though the theories propounded by Mr. George are by no

We do not say give us your money and we will do your means new to English thought, since all philosophers, froin work for you. It cannot be done by proxy. If you know John Locke to J. S. Mill and H. Spencer, have maintained these things and do not actively help us or some kindred that the land should be used for the benefit of the com

society, you are concealers of the truth, and your life is a

lie before God and man. munity, and not for the advantage of individuals ; yet

All can help; from those to whom Mr. George is the first who has been able to popularise little power has been entrusted little will be expected, but this idea. So it may be said that“ Progress and Poverty

still that little will be expected ; from those to whom great has in large measure caused the foundation of the Land powers have been given, whether it be of position or eloReform Union. The wide circulation which that book quence, or intellect, or wealth, we do expect much. This has had leads us to expect a large measure of support from

cause must be won by perfect and unstinted self-sacrifice. the country. As we have said above, our object is the We appeal to you for your support in words and actions ; restitution of the land to the people, because in the words

we ask you to sacrifice your, it may be, well-earned of H. Spencer, “However ditticult it may be to embody leisure. There is work for all. To all, then, we say, in the that theory in fact, equity sternly commands it to be done."

name of suffering humanity, “Come over and help us.” We do not assert that Land Nationalisation will prove a panacea for all human woes, but we do know that it will cure many of the evils under which modern civilisation is

TO THE RICH FOLLOWERS OF THE POOR suffering Such, then, being our object, the methods by which we

NAZARENE. shall strive to attain it will be by getting up meetings and lectures which shall stir the apathetic mass of the people, Arise, ye worshippers of Christ, the God in man revealed, and by disseminating literature which shall teach all Woose stripes and scourge-wounds bleed afresh, whose classes the absolute justice of the reform for which we are

scarred brows are not healed. striving.

Why suffer yet your brother-men, as suffered once your We shall utterly refuse to appeal to the cupidity of a

Christ: class or to class prejudices. It is the work of all true For silver pieces now, as then, men's lives are sacrificed. reformers to heal the wounds of humanity, and not to tear them open wider by setting class against class. It is well | Ah ! ye whose happy homes are bright with wealth that to remember that if some members of our social body are

others make, brought up under such horrible conditions as to make, in

Whose fair white hands are soft while their's are hardened Kingsley's words, “Cleanliness impossible ; drunkenness

for your sake, all but excusable; and prostitution all but natural,” yet Whose ears have heard the toilers' mean full many a time, other members have been brought up under such condi

and oft, tions as to make landowning all but excusable. How could Say, are your hearts turned all to stone, although your landlords do otherwise than accept their position when

hands are soft ? society has taught thein that it is just as natural to own land as any other commodity. The same charity which

We testify against you, lo, ye careless ones and cold, we bestow on those members of society who are obviously

Is it nothing to you passing by that men are bought and

sola ? victims of circumstances we must extend to landlorils, even if they oppose us bitterly. We must forgive them,

Is it nought that, in the streets your dainty feet disdain to

tread, for they know not what they do.

Your sisters sell their love for shame to earn their daily To carry on the work of the society we shall want

bread : funils--that is certain ; but we have no doubt of their being forthcoming. What is much more important is, Go, kneel and pray, “Give us this day our daily bread, O that we should have men and women to join us from every Lord ;' town and village of the United Kingdoin. Men who are

Your tongue-worship is rejected, your lip-sacrifice abhorred; willing to , secretly, like Nicodemus, and support us merely by their ve

Yea, eince your daily bread ye steal from those that toil subscriptions, but men who will stand side by side with us High heaven shall shut its gates on you and let the toilers in the broad light of day and espouse the cause, even in. though unpopular, because it is a just one. We want all sorts and conditions of men. We want women whose ten. Now, therefore, ere night cometh-when no work may be der hearts are torn by the misery and suffering around done, them, which they have felt powerless to help. We want Now, ere Death draw his veil across the splendour of the the working men of the cities, who know, from a hard and bitter personal experience, the awful evils which private Now, since ye may, while yet ’tis day, God's benison ensure, ownership of land inflicts on the poor of our great towns Arise, go forth, sell that ye have, and give unto the poor.

and spin,

a

sun,

man.

A VOICE FROM THE PIT.

a commercial undertaking. You cannot expect a manager

to keep on a piece which does not pay, artistic or not! It OPTIMIST critics, with or without inspiration born of is recorded of Mr Vanderbilt, that on being asked if he managerial suppers, have substantial ground for their consideration for the travelling public, he replied, "The tra

was so particular about the comfort of his railways out of chorus of satisfaction with the state of the modern stage. The performance of the “Rivals" at the Vaudeville is of velling public be d—d. Comfort pays: and so I mahe an excellence hardly surpassed even by “Much Ado About my railways comfortable.” For railways read stage, for Nothing ” at the Lyceum. “The Silver King” is a

comfort read artistic finish, and for the travelling public, thoroughly sound and wholesome play of its kind, only the theatre-going people. Who are the Vanderbilts of the narred in performance by the weakness of the leading

stage? ladies." Iolanthe,” if not quite equal to “ Patience,” and the rest, is very pretty and very funny; and the “Merry

ROYAL ACADEMY. Duchess" is a clever following of the “ Savoy school.” So far, we are quite willing to join in the optimist hymn of

(FIRST NOTICE.) praise to modern managers, with certain reservations and We have thought it better in this first notice, to confine exceptions of our own.

our remarks to a more general inquiry as to the present Nor have we much desire to find fault with the blood direction of the art of this country, as represented in the and-thunder business at the Adelphi-- better than the Royal Academy, than to attempt any detailed criticism average—and at what are called minor theatres. High- of individual works. The first thing that will strike us in flown sentiment and vociferous morality are the genuine a survey of the Exhibition is the absence of all imaginative expression of an ideal to the minds of large classes of work-of all work that appeals to the highest faculties in persons. They speak of a life better and more beautiful

There will be found the usual amount of canvas than that which is daily lived by those who applaud. The which had been better never painted, of which Nos. greeting with which pit and gallery never fail to receive 232 (F. Dicksee), 279 (H. W. B. Davis) and 297 (Vicat some high-pitched speech about honour and virtue is the Cole) are conspicuous examples; a large number of porsign of a healthy instinct, even though those who cheer traits, among which one by Millais of Hook the painter, and loudest may be farthest from practical personal accep- another of a girl by Watts, stand in the front rank, the tance.

latter, though not without defects of drawing, perhaps the But there are signs in the theatrical sky upon which, for finest picture in the Exhibition ; magnificent painting of our part, we cannot look with satisfaction. For example, textures by Tadema ; robust painting of coast scenery the plays now being performed at the two chief theatres of by Hook, and possibly the most beautiful example of the West-end, though interpreted with admirable art, deal Brett that has yet left his studio; a certain amount of with unpleasant and unwholesome subjects. A fair case work that is deliberately false, of which Nos. 688 (Keeley can perhaps be made out on behalf of “Impulse," and the Halsvelle) and 807 (Fahey) may be noted ; a large amount strong motives of life must not be forbidden to the of space occupied by studies, chiefly landscapes, where dramatist any more than to the novelist. Still, the play is no arrangement or selection is attempted, and brilnot of the type for which we look from Mr. and Mrs. liant work of young men of the Continental school, Kendal, and we regret that they should have given in to and we have mentioned all that the limits of this article the taste for French adaptations when plenty of good Eng. will allow. In our next we shall hope to enter lish plays are to hand, and capable English playwrights are

into more detailed notice of individual works. not few “Impulse,” however, is wholesome by the side of It is indeed a melancholy task to those who believe " Fédora.” That this most repulsive piece should appear at in the significance of Art as a teacher to look round upon the Haymarket at all, that it should follow the Robert- the walls of the present Exhibition as an exponent of this

comedies, that it should be adapted by the view. How long may the eye wander ere it rest on one ablest and most original of living English dramatists, are patient, faithful piece of work, one labour of love, cne facts as depressing as they are surprising: Mrs. Bernard picture not alone painted for gain, but because the painter Beere has won for herself a place in the first rank by her would tell us something which he alone could tell, that he performance of Madame Bernhardt's part. But all her had found this beauty, which we in the hurry of our skill cannot make up for the essential badness of the play. little lives would have passed by. He shows us

Burlesque still lingers out a moribund existence at the this, and perhaps he makes us happier. But in another Gaiety, thanks to the galvanic skill of Mr. F. C. Burnand case, in nearly all cases, if we are thoughtful men, he and of the clever “Blue-beard” company, worthy of better will make us sad. Let us walk round these galleries, work. French comic opera seems to have dethroned the once and we shall not see, I think--and in this most critics are mighty sovereign burlesque. The "Cloches de Corneville,” | agreed—we shall hardly see one poetical picture, hardly could boast of a pretty story and of really tuneful music; one! Now, as it appears to us that there lies a great but for the rest which have followed it, -the rest is silence. significance in this absence of the highest forms of Art, we “Rip Van Winkle" is only redeemed by Mr. Leslie's really shall be pardoned if we give a short time to considering remarkable performance, and by Mr. Brough's character in what this poetic faculty consists ; this power of making acting. Miss Cameron is always graceful and charming ; us seel. Whether it be a faculty existing only in the bat what is to be said of the criticism which styles her a minds of the most gifted, or a faculty which we all first-class actress and ecstasises over her exquisite voice ! more or less possess—a music that is breathing everywhere, On the whole, this deluge of “comic opera” is not to our whether it be in spite of the man, or in consequence of liking

the man, whether this same poetry be not another name Why was the “Promise of May” such a failure? It for Truth, and him whom we call poet, genius, and the like, was well acted, well put on the stage, and-thanks to an he who sees into the realities of things, and tells us what he eccentric peer-singularly well advertised. It was full of sees, that the real is the true Ideal, and that the Beautiful pretty things--the “ Last Load Home” of itseif should can only exist in the True. This, too, that we call imaginahave secured the run of the play--but Edgar's long philo- tive power is but a deeper insight into Truth ; cnly sophical disquisitions, the occasional empty stage, the imaginative to those who cannot see it to be true. The great absence of the humorous element, and perhaps more than 'painter will say “I have painted a true thing,” leaving all, the failure to mete out poetic justice to the villain, it to his reviewers to call it imaginative, who call that contributed to condemn it. Yet it was a play of a type imaginative which they do not see to be true. What we we wish was to be seen more often-refined, poetic, ideal. wish to point out is, that the one is only the semblance of But Manchester principles are in the ascendant, and we the other, that they exist one and indivisible ; that you know that theatrical management is less of an artistic than can no more divide them than you can divide soul and

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