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There is little etiquette at Harrowgate, nor are the company pestered with the officious and interested cringings of an obsequious Master of the Ceremonies. They appropriate one from among themselves, such as may have good-nature enough and ability to undertake the office during his visit. At dinner the gentlemen treat the ladies with wine; who in the afternoon return the compliment by treating the gentlemen with tea; and all this seems to be done in perfect amity.

There is a billiard-table at each village, where there is much play, but little gambling; they were erected for amusement, and, that every one may

have their share, the ladies are not excluded.

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The Library is not of the greatest magnitude, but is pleasantly situated on a rising ground, between Upper and Lower Harrowgate; it is an agreeable lounge, where you are accommodated with newspapers, hear the novelties of the day, and sometimes form a good society.

Harrowgate is two hundred and twelves miles from London, and fifteen miles north of Leeds in Yorkshire.

SCARBOROUGH.

In your way from Harrowgate to Scarborough, you go through the ancient and venerable city of York, the metropolis of the northern part of

England.

England. It is well worth the traveller's while to rest a day in this city, especially if he should possess a taste for antiquity.

The Cathedral is perhaps one of the largest Gothic structures in Christendom, shamefully huddled up and obtruded upon by the pitiful houses that enclose it, almost to the very steps of every entrance; so that you are mortified by having only a piecemeal view of this national ornament from any point whatever.

This city is built on a fine gravelly soil, like to that about London, and the face of the country around the two cities bears a strong resemblance; to each other.

The

The river Ouze is navigable, glides gently through it, and empties itself. into the Humber, which makes its way with great rapidity into the great

ocean.

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The one-arched bridge which crosses the Ouze at York is said to be

very ancient, is built with stone, and is not much unlike the Rialto at Venice. The promenade here is a beautiful well-gravelled walk, near to the river side, meandering for the

space mile, on which are erected many handsome and commodious seats, well placed under tall embowering trees. Between the walk and the river is a well-grown quickset hedge, where here and there the wreathing woodbine shews its head, negligent and sweet, diffusing its refreshing essence

around

around on every gentle gale; the hedge therefore serves not only as an ornament but a defence from the river at the same time; the whole of this celebrated retreat terminates with an extensive labyrinth or maze, where playful love often runs his giddy round.

There are few cities or towns in the kingdom that can boast of a more luxuriant retreat for a summer's evening lounge than the inhabitants of York.

Great part of the ancient walls of this extensive city are still standing in good condition, which are very convenient to those who wish to exercise themselves in a lucid season, being well flagged with broad smooth stones; and, as the walls stand high,

they

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