A Short History of Europe, 1600-1815: Search for a Reasonable World

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M.E. Sharpe, 19 oct. 2000
A concise and lively survey that introduces students to the people, ideas, and conflicts in European history from the Thirty Years' War to the Napoleonic Era. The authors draw on new work in gender studies, environmental history, anthropology and cultural history to illustrate the animating force of the period: the assumption that the world could be made amenable to human reason, though precisely how that was to be done remained highly contested. The nature of those contests--in politics, culture, and society--is traced throughout the book. The work includes discussions of developments in science, art, and literature. A chronology of people and events concludes each chapter and there is a glossary of key terms at the end of the book.

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Cuprins

Introduction Sad Stories of the Death of Kings
1
ca 16001660
7
The European World in 1600
9
A Society of Localities
30
The Mental Universe
52
Politics or Religion? The Thirty Years War
73
Who Should Rule in England?
96
ca 16601720
121
Public Sphere and Private Lives
227
Enlightenment Reason Nature and Progress
248
Enlightenment in National Context
267
Enlightened Absolutism
285
A Consumer Society
303
ca 17901815
327
The Reform of France
329
Turns of Fortunes Wheel France 17891795
350

Louis XIV and Absolute Monarchy
123
The Arts in the Age of the Baroque
146
Trade War and Monarchy in the Seventeenth Century
167
Europe Overseas
189
The Pursuit of Truth
209
ca 17301790
225
Napoleon and the Export of the French Revolution
376
Glossary
401
Notes
407
Index
421
About the Authors
449
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Termeni și expresii frecvente

Pasaje populare

Pagina 56 - This is the excellent foppery of the world, that, when we are sick in fortune,— often the surfeit of our own behaviour,— we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars : as if we were villains by necessity ; fools by' heavenly compulsion ; knaves, thieves, and treachers, by spherical predominance ; drunkards, liars, and adulterers, by an enforced obedience of planetary influence...
Pagina 113 - I deny not, but that it is of greatest concernment in the Church and Commonwealth, to have a vigilant eye how books demean themselves as well as men; and thereafter to confine, imprison, and do sharpest justice on them as malefactors. For books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are...
Pagina 113 - Dragon's teeth; and being sown up and down, may chance to spring up armed men. And yet, on the other hand, unless wariness be used, as good almost kill a man as kill a good book: Who kills a man kills a reasonable creature, God's image; but he who destroys a good book, kills reason itself, kills the image of God, as it were in the eye.
Pagina 209 - ... the inquiry of truth, which is the lovemaking, or wooing of it; the knowledge of truth, which is the presence of it; and the belief of truth, which is the enjoying of it, is the sovereign good of human nature.
Pagina 116 - I think that the poorest he that is in England hath a life to live, as the greatest he; and therefore truly, sir, I think it's clear, that every man that is to live under a government ought first by his own consent to put himself under that government...
Pagina 114 - He, above the rest In shape and gesture proudly eminent, Stood like a tower. His form had yet not lost All her original brightness, nor appeared Less than archangel ruined, and the excess Of glory obscured...
Pagina 54 - The heavens themselves, the planets, and this centre, Observe degree, priority, and place, Insisture, course, proportion, season, form, Office, and custom, in all line of order...
Pagina 282 - He looks and laughs at a' that. A prince can mak' a belted knight, A marquis, duke, and a' that; But an honest man's aboon his might, Guid faith, he mauna fa' that! For a
Pagina 197 - The state of slavery is in its own nature bad. It is neither useful to the master nor to the slave ; not to the slave, because he can do nothing through a motive of virtue; nor to the master, because by having an unlimited authority over his slaves he insensibly accustoms himself to the want of all moral virtues, and thence becomes fierce, hasty, severe, choleric, voluptuous, and cruel.
Pagina 174 - Or else when by the Miscarriages of those in Authority, it is forfeited; upon the Forfeiture of their Rulers, or at the Determination of the Time set, it reverts to the Society, and the People have a Right to act as Supreme, and continue the Legislative in themselves, or erect a new Form, or under the old form place it in new hands, as they think good.

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