King Richard III

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The Floating Press, 1 ian. 2009 - 271 pagini
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Richard III belongs to Shakespeare's folio of King Richard plays, and is the longest of his plays after Hamlet. It is classified variously as a tragedy and a history, showing the reign of Richard III in an unflattering light. The play's length springs in part from its reference to the other Richard plays, with which Shakespeare assumed his audience would be familiar. These references and characters are often edited out to create an abridged version when the play is performed for modern audiences.

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Cuprins

Persons Represented
5
ACT I
8
Scene I London A Street
9
Scene II London Another Street
19
Scene III London A Room in the Palace
38
Scene IV London A Room in the Tower
61
ACT II
80
Scene I London A Room in the Palace
81
Scene V London The Tower Walls
150
Scene VI London A Street
157
Scene VII London Court of Baynards Castle
159
ACT IV
174
Scene I London Before the Tower
175
Scene II London A Room of State in the Palace
183
Scene III London Another Room in the Palace
194
Scene IV London Before the Palace
199

Scene II Another Room in the Palace
90
Scene III London A Street
100
Scene IV London A Room in the Palace
105
ACT III
112
Scene I London A Street
113
Scene II Before Lord Hastings House
129
Scene III Pomfret Before the Castle
139
Scene IV London A Room in the Tower
142
Scene V A Room in Lord Stanleys House
236
ACT V
238
Scene I Salisbury An Open Place
239
Scene II Plain Near Tamworth
241
Scene III Bosworth Field
243
Scene IV Another Part of the Field
267
Scene V Another Part of the Field
269
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Despre autor (2009)

William Shakespeare, 1564 - 1616 Although there are many myths and mysteries surrounding William Shakespeare, a great deal is actually known about his life. He was born in Stratford-Upon-Avon, son of John Shakespeare, a prosperous merchant and local politician and Mary Arden, who had the wealth to send their oldest son to Stratford Grammar School. At 18, Shakespeare married Anne Hathaway, the 27-year-old daughter of a local farmer, and they had their first daughter six months later. He probably developed an interest in theatre by watching plays performed by traveling players in Stratford while still in his youth. Some time before 1592, he left his family to take up residence in London, where he began acting and writing plays and poetry. By 1594 Shakespeare had become a member and part owner of an acting company called The Lord Chamberlain's Men, where he soon became the company's principal playwright. His plays enjoyed great popularity and high critical acclaim in the newly built Globe Theatre. It was through his popularity that the troupe gained the attention of the new king, James I, who appointed them the King's Players in 1603. Before retiring to Stratford in 1613, after the Globe burned down, he wrote more than three dozen plays (that we are sure of) and more than 150 sonnets. He was celebrated by Ben Jonson, one of the leading playwrights of the day, as a writer who would be "not for an age, but for all time," a prediction that has proved to be true. Today, Shakespeare towers over all other English writers and has few rivals in any language. His genius and creativity continue to astound scholars, and his plays continue to delight audiences. Many have served as the basis for operas, ballets, musical compositions, and films. While Jonson and other writers labored over their plays, Shakespeare seems to have had the ability to turn out work of exceptionally high caliber at an amazing speed. At the height of his career, he wrote an average of two plays a year as well as dozens of poems, songs, and possibly even verses for tombstones and heraldic shields, all while he continued to act in the plays performed by the Lord Chamberlain's Men. This staggering output is even more impressive when one considers its variety. Except for the English history plays, he never wrote the same kind of play twice. He seems to have had a good deal of fun in trying his hand at every kind of play. Shakespeare wrote 154 sonnets, all published on 1609, most of which were dedicated to his patron Henry Wriothsley, The Earl of Southhampton. He also wrote 13 comedies, 13 histories, 6 tragedies, and 4 tragecomedies. He died at Stratford-upon-Avon April 23, 1616, and was buried two days later on the grounds of Holy Trinity Church in Stratford. His cause of death was unknown, but it is surmised that he knew he was dying.

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