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-Come gentlemen,

Let us consult upon to-morrow's business;
Into my tent, the air is raw and cold.

ACASTO RETURNING FROM HUNTING.
To-day has been a day of glorious sport;
When you, Castalio, and your brother, left me,
Forth from the thickets rush'd another boar,
So large, he seem'd the tyrant of the woods,
With all his dreadful bristles rais'd up high,
They seem'd a grove of spears upon his back;
Foaming he came at me, where I was posted,
Best to observe which way he'd lead the chase,
Whetting his huge large tusks, and gaping wide,
As he already had me for his prey!

Till, brandishing my well-prized javelin high,
With this bold executing arm I struck
The ugly brindled monster to the heart.
Was't not glorious sport?

KING HENRY V. TO HIS OFFICERS.
Good morrow, brother Bedford; God Almighty,
There is some soul of goodness in things evil,
Would men observingly distil it out;
For our bad neighbour makes us early stirrers,
Which is both healthful and good husbandry;
Besides, they are our outward consciences,
And preachers to us all; admonishing
That we should dress us fairly for our end.
Thus we may gather honey from the weed,
And make a moral of the devil himself.
Upon example, so the spirit is eased;
And, when the mind is quicken'd out of doubt,
The organs, though defunct and dead before,
Break up their drowsy grave, and newly move
With casted slough, and fresh celerity.

Lend me thy cloak, Sir Thomas; brothers both,
Commend me to the princes in our camp;
Do my good morrow to them, and anon,
Desire them all to my pavilion.

BELLARIUS TO GUILDERIUS AND ARVIRAGUS.
A goodly day, not to keep house with such
Who's roof's as low as ours; See, boys! this gate
Instructs you how t'adore the heav'ns; and bows you
To morning's holy office. The gates of monarchs
Are arch'd so high, that giants may jet through,
And keep their impious turbans on, without
Good morrow to the sun. Hail, thou fair heaven!
We house i' th' rock, yet use thee not so hardly,
As prouder livers do.

Cheerfulness, in its highest state, sometimes borders on mirth; as in the following example.

MERCUTIO RALLYING ROMEO ON HIS LOVE.

Nay, I'll conjure too,

Romeo! humours! madman! passion! lover!
Appear thou in the likeness of a sigh;
Speak but one rhyme, and I am satisfied;
Cry but ah me! couple but love and dove.
Speak to my gossip Venus one fair word,
One nick-name for her purblind son and heir ;-
-I conjure thee by Rosaline's bright eyes,
By her high forehead and her scarlet lip,
That in thy likeness thou appear to us.
MIRTH.

Mirth, when accompanied by laughter, opens still more than cheerfulness, the mouth towards the ears, crisps the nose, lessens the aperture of the eyes, and sometimes fills them with tears,shaking and convulsing, when violent, the whole frame, and giving in that state considerable pain; which occasions holding the sides. Milton invokes mirth, in his Allegro, in the following beautifully poetic language :

MILTON'S INVOCATION OF MIRTH.

-Come, thou goddess, fair and free,

In heav'n yclept Euphrosyné,
And by men, heart-easing mirth,
Whom lovely Venus at a birth,

With two sister graces more,

To ivy crowned Bacchus bore,—

Haste thee, Nymph, and bring with thee

Jest and youthful jollity.

Quips, and cranks, and wanton wiles,

Nods and becks, and wreathed smiles,

Such as hang on Hebe's cheek,

And love to lie in dimple sleek,

Sport that wrinkled Care derides,

And Laughter, holding both his sides.

MERCUTIO'S DESCRIPTION OF THE FAIRY MAB.

O, then I see Queen Mab hath been with you,

-She is the fairies' midwife; and she comes

In shape no bigger than an agate stone
On the fore finger of an alderman;
Drawn with a team of little atomies
Athwart men's noses as they lie asleep.

Her waggon spokes, made of long spinners' legs;
The cover, of the wings of grasshoppers;
The traces, of the smallest spider's web;
The collars, of the moonshine's wat'ry beams;
Her whip, of cricket's bone, the lash, of film;
Her waggoner, a small grey-coated gnat,
Not half so big as a round little worm

Prick'd from the lazy finger of a maid:
-Her chariot is an empty hazle nut,
Made by the joiner squirrel, or old grub,
Time out of mind the fairy's coachmakers.
And in this state she gallop's night by night
Through lover's brains, and then they dream of love;
On courtier's knees, that dream on court'sies straight;
O'er lawyer's fingers, who straight dream on fees;
O'er ladies' lips, who straight on kisses dream;
-Sometimes she gallops o'er a courtier's nose,
And then he dreams of smelling out a suit.
And sometimes comes she with a tythe-pig's tail,
Tickling the parson's as 'a lies asleep;
Then dreams he of another benefice;
Sometimes she driveth o'er a soldier's neck,
And then dreams he of cutting foreign throats,
Of breaches, ambuscades, Spanish blades,
Of healths five fathom deep; and then, anon,
Drums in his ear, at which he starts, and wakes,
And being thus frighted, swears a prayer or two,
And sleeps again.

WITTOLL TO SHARPER-OLD BATCHELOR.

Ha! ha ha! a very good jest I profess; ha! ha ha! a very good jest; and I did not know that I had said it, and that's a better jest than t'other, 'tis a sign you and I ha'nt been long acquainted; you have lost a good jest for want of knowing me: I only mean a friend of mine whom I call my back; he sticks as close to me, and follows me through all dangers; he is indeed back, breast, and head-piece, as it were to me, egad, he's a brave fellow. Paugh, I'm quite another thing when I'm with him. I do'nt fear the devil (bless us) almost, if he be by. O, here a' comes. [Enter Capt. Bluff. Ay, my Hector of Troy, welcome my bully, my back; egad, my heart has gone pit a pat for thee-Ha! ha! ha!

FAIRY, ROBIN'S GOODFELLOW.
Thou speak'st aright;

I am that merry wanderer of the night:
I jest to Oberon, and make him smile,
When I a fat and bean-fed horse beguile,
Neighing in likeness like a filly foal:
And sometimes lurk I in a gossip's bowl.
In very likeness of a roasted crab,
And when she drinks, against her lips I bob,
And on her wither'd dewlap pour the ale.

-The wisest aunt, telling the saddest tale,
Sometimes for three-legg'd stool mistaketh me,
Then slip I from her, while down topples she,
And tailor cries, and falls into a cough,

And then the whole quire hold their hips and laugh
And waxen in their mirth, and neeze, and swear,
A merrier hour was never wasted there.

Mirth much raised, often-times lead to sport or

RAILLERY.

GRATIANO TRYING TO RAISE ANTONIO'S SPIRITS.

Let me play the fool

With mirth and laughter; so let wrinkles come,
And let my liver rather heat of wine,
Than my heart cool with mortifying groans.
Why should a man, whose blood is warm within
Sit like his grandsire cut in albaster?

Sleep when he wakes, and creep into the jaundice
By being peevish? I tell thee what, Antonio,
(I love thee, and 'tis my love that speaks)
There are a sort of men whose visages
Do cream and mantle like a standing pond,
And do a wilful stillness entertain,
With purpose to be dress'd in an opinion
Of wisdom, gravity, profound conceit,
As who should say, I am Sir Oracle,
And when I ope my lips, let no dog bark!
I'll tell thee more of this another time;
But fish not with this melancholy bait
For this fool's gudgeon, this opinion.
Come, good Lorenzo, fare ye well awhile,
I'll end my exhortation after dinner.

Joy.

Joy, or Gladness, when sudden and violent, expresses itself by clapping of hands, and exultation, or leaping. The eyes are opened wide: perhaps filled with tears; often raised to heaven, especially by devout persons. The countenance is smiling, not composedly, but with features aggravated. The voice rises from time to time to very high notes.

JOY-FROM COLLINS'S ODE ON THE PASSIONS.

Last come Joy's ecstatic trial:

He, with viny crown advancing,

First to the lively pipe his hand address'd

But soon he saw the brisk awakening viol,

Whose sweet entrancing voice he lov'd the best.
They would have thought, who heard the strain,
They saw, in Tempes' vale, her native maids,
Amids't the festal sounding shades,

To some unwearied minstrel dancing,
While as his flying fingers kiss'd the strings,
Love, fram'd with mirth, a gay fantastic round.
Loose were her tresses seen, her zone unbound,
And he amidst his frolic play,

As if he would the charming air repay,
Shook thousand odours from his dewy wings.

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OROONOKO ON MEETING IMOINDA.

IMOINDA, Oh! this separation

Has made you dearer, if it can be so,
Than you were ever to me!
You appear
Like a kind star to my benighted steps,
To guide me on my way to happiness;
I cannot miss it now. Governor, friend,
You think me mad: but let me bless you all,
Who any way have been the instruments
Of finding her again. Imoinda's found!
And ev'ry thing that I would have in her,

This little spot of earth you stand upon,
Is more to me than the extended plains
Of my great father's kingdom: Here I reign
In full delights, in joys to pow'r unknown;

Your love my empire, and your heart my throne.

FALSTAFF, UPON HEARING THAT PRINCE HENRY HAS THE MONEY, TAKEN FROM HIM AT GAD'S HILL.

Fals. But, by the Lord, lads, I am glad you have the money.-Hostess, clap to' the doors; watch to-night, pray to-morrow. -Gallants, lads, boys, hearts of gold, all the titles of good fellowship come to you! What! shall we be merry? Shall we have a play extempore?

HOW TO EXPRESS THE PASSION OF JOY.

You who would joy's triumphant pride express,
What most you wish, imagine you pessess,
Straight flames th' idea to the kindling eye,
And every nerve in concord braces high:
Treading in air each joint a soul displays;
The looks all lighten,—and the limbs all blaze.
OTHELLO ON MEETING DESDEMONA.
It gives me wonder, great as my content,
To see you here before me. 0 my soul's joy!
If after every tempest come such calms,

May the winds blow till they have waken'd death;
And let the labouring barque climb hills of seas,
Olympus high; and duck again as low

As hell's from heaven. If I were now to die,
"Twere now to be most happy; for I fear
My soul hath her content so absolute,
That not another comfort like to this
Succeeds in unknown Fate.

SETTLED JOY OR PLEASURE.
ACASTO ON CHAMONT'S ARRIVAL.
Thus happy, who would envy pompous power,
The luxury of courts, or wealth of cities?
Let there be joy through all the house this day!
In every room let plenty flow at large!
It is the birth-day of my royal master!

-Let me embrace ye both! now, by the souls

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