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IV.

v.

VI.

VII.

VIII.

Page Califthenes's Reproof of Cleon's Flattery to Alexander.

Quintus Curtius. 145 The Scythian Ambassadors to Alexander. ibid.

146 Galgacus the General of the Caledonii to his Army, to incite them to Action against the Romans.

Tacitus. 149 The Earl of Arundel's Speech, proposing an Accommodation

between Henry II. and Stephen. Lord Lyttelton. 152 Mr. Pulteney's Speech on the Motion for reducing the Army.

158
Sir John St. Aubin's Speech for repealing the Septennial
Act.

161
Sir Robert Walpole's Reply:
Lord Lyttelton's Speech on the Repeal of the Act called the
Jew Bill, in the Year 1753.

174 In Praise of Virtue.

Price.
The Speech of Brutus on the Death of Cæsar. Sbakespear. 179
Glocefter's Speech to the Nobles.

ibid.

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168

XI.

178

XII. XIII. XIV.

18.

BOOK VI.
D I AL O G U E S.

J. On Happiness.

Harris. 182 II. The same Subject.

ibid.

188 lll. On Criticism.

Sterne.

193 IV. On Negroes.

ibid.

195 V. Rivers and Sir Harry.

False Delicacy. 196 VI. Sir John Melvil and Sterling. Clandestine Marriage. 198 VII. Belcour and Stockwell.

West Indian.

203 VIII. Lord Euftace and Frampton. School for Rakes. 206 IX. Duke and Lord.

Sbakespear. 210 X. Duke and Jaques.

ibid.

212 XI. Henry and Lord Chief Justice.

ibid.

215 XII. Archbishop of Canterbury and Bishop of Ely. ibid. 217 XIII. Hamlet and Horatio.

ibid.

220 XIV. Brutus and Cassius,

ibid.

223 XV. Belarius, Guiderius, and Arviragus. ibid.

.

228

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Gray.

243
248

278

ibid. 291

ibid.

Collins. 293

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O be ever active in laudable pursuits, is the dif-
tinguishing characteristic of a man of merit.

There is an heroic innocence, as well as an

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heroic courage.

THBRE is a mean in all things. Even virtue itself hath its stated limits; which not being ftri&tly observed, it ceases to be virtue.

It is wiser to prevent a quarrel beforehand, than to revenge it afterwards.

It is much better to reprove, than to be angry secretly.

No revenge is more heroic, than that which torments envy, by doing good.

The discretion of a man deferreth his anger, and it is his glory to pass over a tranfgreffion.

MONEY, like manure, does no good till it is spread. There is no real use of riches, except in the distribution: the rest is all conceit.

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A wise man will defire no more than what he may get justly, use soberly, distribute cheerfully, and live upon contentedly.

A contented mind, and a good conscience, will make a man happy in all conditions. He knows not how to fear, who dares to die.

There is but one way of fortifying the fout against all gloomy prefages and terrors of mind; and that is, by fechring to ourselves the friendship and protection of that Being who disposes of events, and governs futurity.

PHILOSOPHY is then only valuable, when it serves for the law of life, and not for the oftentation of science.

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be always

than a

WITHOU
TITHOUT a friend the world is but a wilderness,

A MAN may have a thousand intimate acquaintances, and not a friend among them all. If you have one friend, think yourself happy. When once you profess yourself a friend, endeavour to

such. He can never have any true friends, that will be often changing them.

PROSPERITY gains friends, and adversity tries them.

Nothing more engages the affections of men, handsome address, and graceful conversation.

COMPLAISANCE renders a fuperior amiable, an equal agreeable, and an inferior acceptable.

Excess of ceremony shews want of breeding. That ci. vility is best, which excludes all superfluous formality.

INGRATITUDE is a crime so Mhameful, that the man was never yet found, who would acknowledge himself guilty of it.

TRUTH

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