Toilers of the Sea, Volumul 2

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Sampson, Low, Son, & Marston, 1866
 

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Pagina 132 - What man is this that walketh in the field to meet us? And the servant had said, It is my master: therefore she took a vail, and covered herself.
Pagina 132 - And Isaac went out to meditate in the field at the eventide: and he lifted up his eyes, and saw, and, behold, the camels were coming. 64 And Rebekah lifted up her eyes, and when she saw Isaac, she lighted off the camel. 65 For she had said unto the servant, What man is this that walketh in the field to meet us?
Pagina 139 - One [object], which was almost imperceptible in the wide movement of the waters, was a sailing boat. In this was a man. It was the sloop. The other, black, motionless, colossal, rose above the waves, a singular form. Two tall pillars issuing from the sea bore aloft a cross-beam which was like a bridge between them. This bridge, so singular in shape that it was impossible to imagine what it was from a distance, touched each of the two pillars. It resembled a vast portal. Of what use could such an...
Pagina 324 - The first cross-pieces of the breakwater being fixed, Gilliatt mounted upon them and listened once more. The murmurs had become significant. He continued his construction. He supported it with the two catheads of the Durande, bound to the frame of beams by cords passed through the three pulley-sheaves. He made the whole fast by chains. The construction was little more than a colossal hurdle, having beams for rods and chains in the place of wattles. It seemed woven together, quite as much as built....
Pagina 314 - The aspect of the sea was extraordinary. The water seemed afire. As far as the eye could reach, among the reefs and beyond them, the sea ran with flame. The flame was not red ; it had nothing in common with the grand living fires of volcanic craters or of great furnaces. There was no sparkling, no glare, no purple edges, no noise. Long trails of a pale tint simulated upon the water the folds of a winding sheet. A trembling glow was spread over the waves. It was the spectre of a great fire rather...
Pagina 317 - ... had long been her companion. That mysterious entity which we call the ocean had nothing in its secret thoughts which he could not divine. Observation, meditation, and solitude had given him a quick perception of coming changes, of wind, or cloud, or wave. Gilliatt hastened to the top ropes and payed out some cable; then being no longer held fast by the anchors, he seized the boat-hook of the sloop, and pushed her towards the entrance to the gorge some fathoms from the Durande, and quite near...
Pagina 140 - ... shape that it was impossible to imagine what it was from a distance, touched each of the two pillars. It resembled a vast portal. Of what use could such an erection be in that open plain, the sea, which stretched around it far and wide ? Its wild outline stood well-defined against the clear sky. " The two perpendicular forms were the Douvres. The huge mass held fast between them, like an architrave between two pillars, was the wreck of the Durande.'1 — Victor Httr/o.
Pagina 321 - He listened a second time. The distant noise recommenced. Gilliatt shook his head like one who recognizes at last something familiar to him. A few minutes later he was at the other extremity of the alley between the rocks, at the entrance facing the east, which had remained open until then, and by heavy blows of his hammer was driving large nails into the sides of the gullet near "The Man" rock, as he had done at the gullet of the Douvres.
Pagina 323 - a dam." The breakwater is the chevaux-de-frise of fortifications against tempests. Man can only struggle against the sea by taking advantage of this principle of dividing its forces. Meanwhile, the sun had risen, and was shining brightly. The sky was clear, the sea calm. Gilliatt pressed on his work. He, too, was calm; but there was anxiety in his haste. He passed with long- strides from rock to rock, and returned dragging wildly sometimes a rider, sometimes a binding strake. The utility of all this...
Pagina 279 - ... of the salvor in his work, famine, fever, nakedness, distress — he had chosen all these for himself ! Such was his selfishness. He was like a man placed in some terrible chamber, which is being slowly exhausted of air. His vitality was leaving him by little and little. He scarcely perceived it. Exhaustion of the bodily strength does not necessarily exhaust the will. Faith is only a secondary power ; the will is the first. The mountains, which faith is proverbially said to move, are nothing...

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