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1781, a grand sortie was made, wherein 114 artillerymen took | protection shall be prohibited from possessing slaves, and from part, to accompany the columns, spike the captured guns, and I acquiring any fresh slaves in the meantime, from this date." destroy the Spanish works. The sortie was perfectly successful. FRIENDLY SOCIETIES.

We have some reason to suppose that But the most interesting event of the siege was the grand there are, perhaps, 4,000,000 of the Queen's subjects members attack by sea and land on the 13th of September, 1782, when

of friendly societies, and we have also reason to suppose that 200 pieces of ordnance mounted on “ stupendous and strong a very large proportion of the whole number of societies is inbattefies and works,” protected by an army of 40,000 men, combined with a fleet of 47 sail of the line, 10 battering ships mission.

solvent. - Report of Friendly Societies' Parliamentary Comcarrying 212 guns, and a host of smaller craft, to shower shot and shell upon the devoted garrison. For a whole day the

LUTHER'S FIRST STUDY OF BIBLE. —- Many will artillery could make no impression on the shields of the remember at the exhibition of the Royal Academy, two or three battering ships, but at last confusion was visible among the years ago, the fine picture by Mr. E. M. Ward, 1. A., repreenemy, the Admiral's ship took fire from the effect of the red. senting young Luther when a monk in the convent at Erfurt, hot shot, and during that night and the next day all the first reading for himself the ancient Bible in the library. It battering ships were destroyed. On the 2nd of February, has been proposed to purchase the picture by public subscrip1783, the exèhange of shots ceased, and friendly courtesies tion, and present it to the British and Foreign Bible Society of ensued between the brave men who would have taken Gibraltar London, to be placed in the library of the new house of the and those who saved it for their country. The Duc de Crillon Society, in Queen Victoria-street, as an appropriate memorial of said afterwards to the officers of Artillery, “Gentlemen, I a leading event in the history of the Bible. The project has would rather see you here as friends than on your batteries as met with the cordial approval of the Society, and the Hon. A. enemies, where you never spared me.”—Captain Duncan's Kinnaird, M.P., is the chairman of the committee. The amount History of the Royal Artillery.

required as the price of the picture is £1000, of which above BUTTER ADULTERATION.—While the London dealers have half has been already promised. An engraving of the picture been denying the assertions of analysts and consumers as to the appears in the “ Sunday at Home" for January. adulteration of fresh butter by suet, the “Pall Mall" reports Sir Edward CODRINGTON.-A pension being offered to Sir that this is a well-known and prosperous branch of trade in Edward Codrington, the hero of Navarino, by the Duke of America :-“Very good butter, it is stated, is prepared now by Wellington on the part of the Government, the Admiral a butter manufactory at New York, according to the following declined, on grounds which did him the highest honour. The process :-Agents are employed to visit slaughter-houses, and recently published Life of Codrington gives the following buy up all the beef suet. This is carted to the factory and account of the scene with the duke : “I have made arrangecleansed. Then it put into meat choppers and minced fine.

ments by which I am enabled to offer you a pension of £800 It is afterwards placed in a boiler with as much water in bulk for your life. The admiral's answer was ready and immediate. as itself. A steam-pipe is introduced among the particles of 'I am obliged to your Grace, but I do not feel myself in a position suet, and they are melted. The refuse of the membrane goes to to accept it.' 'Not accept it? But why not? The king has the bottom of the water, the oily substance floats, and is re- offered it to you, and I don't see how you can well refuse it.' moved. This consists of butter matter and stearine. A tem

*Your Grace must excuse me; I cannot receive such a thing perature of 80 degrees melts the former, and leaves the stearine myself while my poor fellows who fought under me at the bottom. The butter matter or cream is drawn off ; about Navarino have had no head-money, and have not even been 13 per cent. of fresh milk is added and the necessary salt, and repaid for their clothes which were destroyed in the battle.'” the whole is churned for 10 or 15 minutes. The result is Orange county butter at about one-half the usual cost. The stearine is

Nelson's Famous SIGNAL. - In the life of Admiral Codrington sold at 12 cents a round to the candle-maker, and the refuse we find an anecdote not generally known, respecting Nelson's at 7 cents a pound to the manufacturer of food for cattle. famous signal before the battle of Trafalgar : “His lordship A company with a capital of 500,000 dollars has been organised said, “Mr. Pascoe, I wish to say to the fleet, England confides for the manufacture of butter by this method, and it is expected that every man will do his duty, and he added, "You must be that the dividends will amount to 100 per cent.

quick, for I have one more to make, which is for close action.' Parks Of London. — The following are the measurements of 1 replied, 'If your lordship will permit me to substitute the the parks of London and its neighbourhood, as noted by the word "expects”, for "confides,” the signal will soon be comOrdnance Survey - The Regent's Park, 406 acres ; Hyde

Park, pleted, because the word “expects” is in the vocabulary, but the 386 ; Kensington Gardens, 2454 ; Victoria Park, 2238; Batter: word "contides.” must be spelt.' His lordship replied in haste, sea Park, 1291 ; Greenwich Park, 1903 ; Southwark Park, 63 ; and with seeming satisfaction, "That will do, Pascoe ; make it Green Park, 66}; St. James's Park, '58} ; and Kennington directly.” Park 193 acres. These ten parks are situated within the TRADESMEN'S Accounts. A correspondent writes as follows registration district denominated “London,” which comprises on the evil and misery caused by people not paying their debts an area of 78,080 acres. The proportion of park ground to the regularly to their tradesmen and servants. The evil is as whole area of the London district is about one forty-second part notable in London as in any provincial town. "I live in LeaBesides these metropolitan parks, the people of London, who mington, and continually see how the thoughtlessness of can afford or choose to travel some distance, can find magnificent many of the inhabitants, who think the tradespeople can wait public parks at Hampton Court, Richmond, Bushey, Kew, and their convenience to receive but their due, brings distress old Deer, and these five present an additional area of not less and sometimes bankruptcy. To avoid this they are obliged to than 4,200 acres.

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borrow money at a very high rate of interest. Many a shopZANZIBAR TREATY.-The material part of the convention keeper has said to me, Could you lend me a few pounds till actually concluded with the Sultan of Zanzibar is as follows: my Christmas bills are paid. “I dare not again send in my 61. The provisions of the existing treaties having proved bill till quarter-day, for fear of giving offence, and so losing ineffectual for preventing the export of slaves fronı the terri- their custom altogether; and not only that, but they will speak tories of the Sultan of Zanzibar in Africa, Her Majesty the against my shop to their friends.' Queen and His Highness the Sultan above-named agree that A lady frequently goes and orders a dress, the material of from this date the export of slaves from the coast of the main which the maker is desired to procure with all the etceteras land of Africa, whether destined for transport from one part of to it. This lady forgets that the dressmaker has to pay the Sultan's dominions to another or for conveyance to foreign her bills of purchase, often monthly, besides the assistants parts, shall entirely cease. And His Highness the Sultan binds weekly, rent and taxes, food, etc., etc. Yet ladies thought. himself, to the best of his ability, to make an effectual arrange. lessly ask the dressmaker to wait for her payment for a year ment throughout his dominions, to prevent and abolish the same ; and any vessel engaged in the transport or conveyance “Butlers are desired to pay for cab hire, carriage of parcels, etc., of slaves after this date shall be liable to seizure and condemna. without having money given to them on hand for the purpose; tion by all such naval or other officers or agents and such courts this obliges them to pay away their own money, and then they as may be authorised for that purpose on the part of Her are unable to meet their own expenses, especially if they have Majesty.. 2. His Highness the Sultan engages that all public a wife and family to provide for, till it suits their masters' conmarkets in his dominions for the buying and selling of imported venience to settle with them. slaves shall be entirely closed. 3. His Highness the Sultan "Servants’ wages are often not paid regularly. For board above-named engages to protect, to the utmost of his ability, wages, masters seldom think it necessary to pay in advance, all liberated slaves, and to punish severely any attempt to molest which obliges the servants to pay a higher price for their prothem or to reduce them again to slavery. 4. Her Britannic visions, as they have to go upon credit. Many people forget Majesty engages that natives of Indian States under British / that time is money' to the working class of people.” E. S. G.

or more.

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A FAMILY JOURNAL OF INSTRUCTION AND RECREATION.

“ BEHOLD IN THESE WHAT LEISURE IOSRS DZJAND, -ANUSEMENT AND TRUE KNOWLEDGE HAND IN HAND."-Cowper.,

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A

MAIDEN MAY.

entered, a strongly-built man with a bushy black

beard and a sunburnt countenance, the sinister exCHAPTER VIII.-GAFFIN, THIE MILLER.

pression of which was ill-calculated to win confidence, DAM had just recounted to his wife his inter- and whose semi-nautical costume made it doubtful

views with the mayor and lawyer of Morbury, whether he was a landsman or sailor. and had listened to her history of Mr. Herbert “I have come to have a friendly chat with you, if Castleton's family, and the unhappy fate of his you will give me leave ?" daughter, when a knock was heard at the door. The Without waiting for a reply, still keeping his hat dame opened it, but drew back on seeing their visitor. on, he threw himself into a chair by the fire, glancing

“Good-day, neighbour,” said the person who round the room as he did so.
No. 1152.- JANUARY 24, 1874.

PRICE ONE PENNY.

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1781, a grand sortie was made, wherein 114 artillerymen took protection shall be prohibited from possessing slaves, and from part, to accompany the columns, spike the captured guns, and acquiring any fresh slaves in the meantime, from this date.” destroy the Spanish works. The sortie was perfectly successful. FRIENDLY SOCIETIES. - We have some reason to suppose that But the most interesting event of the siege was the grand there are, perhaps, 4,000,000 of the Queen's subjects members attack by sea and land on the 13th of September, 1782, when of friendly societies, and we have also reason to suppose that 200 pieces of ordnance mounted on “stupendous and strong batteries and works,” protected by an army of 40,000 men, solvent. - Report of Friendly Societies' Parliamentary Com

a very large proportion of the whole number of societies is in. combined with a fleet of 47 sail of the line, 10 battering ships mission. carrying 212 guns, and a host of smaller craft, to shower shot and shell upon the devoted garrison. For a whole day the

LUTHER'S FIRST STUDY OF THE BIBLE. — Many will artillery could make no impression on the shields of the remember at the exhibition of the Royal Academy, two or three battering ships, but at last confusion was visible among the years ago, the fine picture by Mr. E. M. Ward, R. A., repreenemy, the Admiral's ship took fire from the effect of the red. senting young Luther when a monk in the convent at Erfurt, hot shot, and during tħat night and the next day all the first reading for himself the ancient Bible in the library. It battering ships were destroyed. On the 2nd of February, has been proposed to purchase the picture by public subscrip1783, the exchange of shots ceased, and friendly courtesies tion, and present it to the British and Foreign Bible Society of ensued between tlle brave men who would have taken Gibraltar London, to be placed in the library of the new house of the and those who saved it for their country. The Duc de Crillon Society, in Queen Victoria-street, as an appropriate memorial of said afterwards to the officers of Artillery, “Gentlemen, I a leading event in the history of the Bible. The project has would rather see you here as friends than on your batteries as met with the cordial approval of the Society, and the Hon. A. enemies, where you never spared me.”—Captain Duncan's Kinnaird, M.P., is the chairman of the committee. The amount History of the Royal Artillery.

required as the price of the picture is £1000, of which above BUTTER ADULTERATION.—While the London dealers have half has been already promised. An engraving of the picture been denying the assertions of analysts and consumers as to the appears in the “ Sunday at Home" for January. adulteration of fresh butter by suet, the “Pall Mall” reports Sir EDWARD CODRINGTON.- A pension being offered to Sir that this is a well-known and prosperous branch of trade in Edward Codrington, the hero of Navarino, by the Duke of America :-“Very good butter, it is stated, is prepared now. by Wellington on the part of the Government, the Admiral a butter manufactory at New York, according to the following declined, on grounds which did him the highest honour. The process :-Agents are employed to visit slaughter-houses, and recently published Life of Codrington gives the following buy up all the beef suet. This is carted to the factory and account of the scene with the duke : "I have made arrangecleansed. Then it is put into meat choppers and minced fine. ments by which I am enabled to offer you a pension of £800 It is afterwards placed in a boiler with as much water in bulk for your life. The admiral's answer was ready and immediate. as itself. A steam-pipe is introduced among the particles of 'I am obliged to your Grace, but I do not feel myself in a position suet, and they are melted. The refuse of the membrane goes to to accept it.' Not accept it? But why not? The king has the bottom of the water, the oily substance floats, and is re

offered it to you, and I don't see how you can well refuse it.' moved. This consists of butter matter and stearine. A tem.

Your Grace must excuse me; I cannot receive such a thing perature of 80 degrees melts the former, and leaves the stearine myself while my poor fellows who fought under me at the bottom. The butter matter or cream is drawn off ; about Navarino have had no head-money, and have not even been 13 per cent. of fresh milk is added and the necessary salt, and repaid for their clothes which were destroyed in the battle.'” the whole is churned for 10 or 15 minutes. The result is Orange county butter at about one-half the usual cost. The stearine is Nelson's Famous SIGNAL.-In the life of Admiral Codrington sold at 12 cents a pound to the candle-maker, and the refuse we find an anecdote not generally known, respecting Nelsou's at 7 cents a pound to the manufacturer of food for cattle. famous signal before the battle of Trafalgar : "His lordship A company with a capital of 500,000 dollars has been organised said, “Mr. Pascoe, I wish to say to the fleet, England confides for the manufacture of butter by this method, and it is expected that every man will do his duty, and he added, "You must be that the dividends will amount to 100 per cent.

quick, for I have one more to make, which is for close action.' PARKS OF LONDON. – The following are the measurements of 1 replied, 'If your lordship will permit me to substitute the the parks of London and its neighbourhood, as noted by the

expects” for confides,” the signal will soon be comOrdnance Survey :-The Regent's Park, 406 acres ; Hyde Park, pleted, because the word "expects” is in the vocabulary, but the 386 ; Kensington Gardens, 245}; Victoria Park, 2237; Batter

word “

word "confides" must be spelt.' His lordship replied in haste, sea Park, 1291; Greenwich Park, 1903 ; Southwark Park, 63 ; and with seeming satisfaction, "That will do, Pascoe ; make it Green Park, 60}; St. James's Park, 58} ; and Kennington

directly.'" Park 194 acres. These ten parks are situated within the Tradesmen's ACCOUNTS.-A correspondent writes as follows registration district denominated “London,” which comprises on the evil and misery caused by people not paying their debts an area of 78,080 acres. The proportion of park ground to the regularly to their tradesmen and servants. The evil is as whole area of the London district is about one forty-second part. notable in London as in any provincial town. “I live in LeaBesides these metropolitan parks, the people of London, who mington, and continually see how the thoughtlessness of can afford or choose to travel some distance, can find magnificent many of the inhabitants, who think the tradespeople can wait public parks at Hampton Court, Richmond, Bushoy, Kew, and their convenience to receive but their due, brings distress Old Deer, and these five present an additional area of not less and sometimes bankruptcy. To avoid this they are obliged to than 4,200 acres.

borrow money at a very high rate of interest. Many a shopZANZIBAR TREATY.-The material part of the convention keeper has said to me, Could you lend me a few pounds till actually concluded with the Sultan of Zanzibar is as follows :- my Christmas bills are paid. I dare not again send in my "1. The provisions of the existing treaties having proved bill till quarter-day, for fear of giving offence, and so losing ineffectual for preventing the export of slaves from the terri. their custom altogether; and not only that, but they will speak tories of the Sultan of Zanzibar in Africa, Her Majesty the against my shop to their friends.' Queen and His Highness the Sultan above-named agree that ' A lady frequently goes and orders a dress, the material of from this date the export of slaves from the coast of the main. which the maker is desired to procure with all the etceteras land of Africa, whether destined for transport from one part of to it... This lady forgets that the dressmaker has to pay the Sultan's dominions to another or for conveyance to foreign her bills of purchase, often monthly, besides the assistants parts, shall entirely cease. And His Highness the Sultan binds weekly, rent and taxes, food, etc., etc. Yet ladies thought. himself, to the best of his ability, to make an effectual arrange. lessly ask the dressmaker to wait for her payment for a year ment throughout his dominions, to prevent and abolish the same; and any vessel engaged in the transport or conveyance "Butlers are desired to pay for cab hire, carriage of parcels, etc., of slaves after this date shall be liable to seizure and condemna. without having money given to them on hand for the purpose ; tion by all such naval or other officers or agents and such courts this obliges them to pay away their own money, and then they as may be authorised for that purpose on the part of Her are unable to meet their own expenses, especially if they have Majesty. 2. His Highness the Sultan engages that all public a wife and family to provide for, till it suits their masters' conmarkets in his dominions for the buying and selling of imported venience to settle with them. slaves shall be entirely closed. 3. His Highness the Sultan "Servants' wages are often not paid regularly. For board above-named engages to protect, to the utmost of his ability, wages, masters seldom think it necessary to pay in advance, all liberated slaves, and to punish severely any attempt to molest which obliges the servants to pay a higher price for their prothem or to reduce them again to slavery. 4. Her Britannic visions, as they have to go upon credit. Many people forget Majesty engages that natives of Indian States under British / that time is money' to the working class of people.'

or more.

E. S, G.

[graphic]

A FAMILY JOURNAL OF INSTRUCTION AND RECREATION.

“ BEHOLD IN THESE WHAT LEISURE HOURS DZJAND,-AVUSEMENT AND TRUE KNOWLEDGE HAND IN HAND."-Cowper.,

[graphic][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

MAIDEN MAY.

entered, a strongly-built man with a bushy black

beard and a sunburnt countenance, the sinister exCHAPTER VIII.-GAFFIN, THE MILLER.

pression of which was ill-calculated to win confidence, A! DAM had just recounted to his wife his inter- and whose semi-nautical costume made it doubtful

views with the mayor and lawyer of Morbury, whether he was a landsman or sailor. and had listened to her history of Mr. Herbert “I have come to have a friendly chat with you, if Castleton's family, and the unhappy fate of his you will give me leave?” daughter, when a knock was heard at the door. The Without waiting for a reply, still keeping his hat dame opened it, but drew back on seeing their visitor. on, he threw himself into a chair by the fire, glancing

"Good-day, neighbour," said the person who round the room as he did so. No. 1152.- JANUARY 24, 1874.

D

PRICE ONE PENNY.

assume.

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“What have you got to talk about, Mr. Gaffin ?” ) ter-pardon me, I don't mean to say anything disasked Adam, disdaining to give the welcome he respectful-even supposing you fail to discover to could not heartily offer, and instead of sitting down, whom she belongs ? " standing with his hands in his pockets opposite his “As to that, Mr. Gaffin, God placed her under our guest, while the dame continued the work in which charge, and we intend to do our duty by her," she had been engaged.

answered Adam, firmly. “I hear you boarded a wreck the other morning “ Your duty would be to obtain for her every and rescued a child from it," observed the visitor. opportunity of retaining the position in which she “I did so," answered Adam, curtly.

was born, said Gaffin. That's no common person's “ What has become of the child, then?” asked child." Mr. Gaffin, looking round the room as if in search of “Maybe she is not; but, as I said before, we will her. The visitor was Miles Gaffin, the miller of do our best. More than that we cannot do," anHurlston, as he was generally called.

swered Adam. "She has gone out for a walk," said the dame, “Now, my friend, I have a proposal to make,” coming up near her husband on hearing the subject said Gaffin, speaking in as frank a tone as he could of the conversation.

“She will be a heavy burden to you some “ You will find the maintenance of a child in addi- time hence, if she is not so at present; my wife and tion to your own somewhat burdensome in these I, as you know, have no daughter, although, like hard times,” observed the miller.

you, we have three sons. We are more independent “We can judge better than our neighbours of the world than you are, as my wife had money; you whether the burden is more than we can bear, will understand, though, I do not eat the bread of answered the dame; “so you see, Mr. Gaffin, that idleness; and as she would very much like to have a need not make any one uneasy on our account.” little girl to bring up to be her companion when our

" Very likely, my good woman, and all very well boys are away, we are willing to take charge of that at present; but the day will come when she will re- child and adopt her, should her friends not be disquire schooling and clothing, and I suppose you had covered. To show you that I am in earnest, here

I not time to bring much property belonging to her on are five guineas as payment to you for going off and shore, Adam Halliburt ? " said Ġaffin, in an inquiring bringing her on shore in the gallant way I undertone.

stand you did. It's a trifling reward, I own, but if I "No, Miles Gaffin, I had less time to bring any have the power I will increase it should you accept

“, thing away than those who visited the wreck before my offer.' me," he answered, fixing his eyes on the visitor, who Adam stood with his hands in his pockets as ho met his glance unmoved.

had been doing while his visitor was speaking: " What! did any one else get on board the wreck, “Keep your money, Mr. Gaffin, for when it may think?"

be required," he answered, quietly. “My lads and "I am sure of it; and whoever they were, they I only did our duty, and what any one with the heart were heartless villains to leave a little child to perish of a man would have tried to do. That little maiden when they might have saved her.”

has been placed in my charge, and until her rightful "Perhaps if people did visit the wreck they were friends appear, my wife and I will take care of her not aware that any human being remained on board,” without looking for payment or reward. You have said Gaffin. “ Did you see any of the crew ? No one our answer, I speak for myself and dame; there is has heard of them, I understand.”

no use wasting more time in talking about the “It's my belief that they attempted to escape in matter." the boats, which were swamped on crossing the "Well, well, neighbour, I cannot take your reply bands," answered Adam. “They deserved their fate, as conclusive," said Gaffin, trying to conceal his too, if they recollected the poor child and her nurse annoyance; "just think it over, and you will ho who were left behind. Though the little dear was doing a great pleasure to my wife and lay us under saved by their base conduct, as she would have been an obligation if you

agree to my proposal." ” lost had they taken her, not the less shame to them. Adam had given his reply, and was determined to However, no one can tell how it happened."

say nothing more. He was anxious, too, to get rid "Of course they attempted to escape in their boats, of his guest. there is no other way to account for their disap- Gaffin at length, finding that he could gain nothing pearance, answered Gaffin; "fow craft except such by staying, rose to leave the cottage. The dame as ours on this coast could live in the sea that was took up May and retired with her to the farther end then running, for it was as bad as could well be, as of the room, while Adam stood as before with his I hear. I myself was away to London on business," hand firmly thrust down into his pocket, as if dehe added, carelessly.

termined not to shake that of his departing guest, Adam kept his eyes on his guest while he was while Jacob opened the door as wide as he could. speaking, but the countenance of the latter main- Gaffin, unabashed, nodded to the fisherman and his tained the same bold, defiant look which it generally dame, and with a swagger in his walk to conceal the

irritation he felt, left the cottage. Jacob watched As Gaffin made the last remark, Jacob, with his him till he had got to some distance. little charge, entered the cottage.

" He has gone,

” he exclaimed. " He shall not Maiden May, on seeing a stranger, kept tight hold have our Maiden May if I can prevent him.” of Jacob's hand, and drew away from the fireplace, "No fear of that, Jacob. He, with his cursing where he was seated.

and swearing, and his wild, lawless ways, and his “Is that the child we have been speaking of?” poor heart-broken, down-spirited wife, bring up a asked Gaffin, looking towards her. "She is indeed little maid in the way she should go! She would be a little beauty. Well

, my friends, I conclude you better off with us as long as we had a crust to give don't intend to bring her up as a fisherman's daugh- / her; and take her from us he shall not, whatever

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