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(B) in paragraph (2), to read as follows:

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“(2) that land-grant and other universities in

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the United States have demonstrated over many

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years their ability to cooperate with international agencies, educational and research institutions in

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other countries, the private sector, and nongovernmental organizations worldwide, in expanding global

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agricultural production, processing, business and

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trade, to the benefit of the United States and other

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economies;";

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(C) in paragraph (3), to read as follows:

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“(3) that, in a world of growing populations with rising expectations, increased food production and improved distribution, storage, and marketing in

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the developing countries is necessary not only to ensure human health and child survival, but to build

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the basis for economic growth and trade, and the so

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cial security in which democracy and free enterprise

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can thrive, moreover, that the greatest potential for

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increasing world food supplies and incomes to purchase food are in the developing countries where the

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gap between food need and food supply is the greatest and current incomes are lowest;";

(D) in paragraph (4), to read as follows:

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"(4) that the engagement of land-grant universities in agricultural development in other countries

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strengthens the competitiveness of United States agi

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riculture and other industries by training future foreign partners and by introducing global perspectives into United States curriculum, research, public in

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formation services, and other extension programs of

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(E) by striking paragraphs (5) and (7), redesignating paragraph (6) as paragraph (7), and inserting the following:

“(5) with expanding global markets and increasing imports into many countries, including the United States, that food safety and quality, as well as secure supply, have emerged as mutual concerns

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"(6) that research, teaching, and extension activities, and appropriate institutional and policy development therefore are prime factors in improving

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agricultural production, food distribution, proc

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essing, storage, and marketing abroad (as well as in

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(F) in paragraph (7) (as redesignated), by

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striking “in the United States” and inserting “and the broader economy of the United States”; and

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(G) by adding at the end the following:

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“(8) that there is a need to preserve and pro

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“(9) that universities and their public and pri

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vate partners need a dependable source of Federal

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funding not requiring State matching funds, as well

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as Federal and State matched funding, and other fi

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nancing, in order to increase the impact of their own investments and those of their State governments and constituencies, in order to continue and expand their effort to advance agricultural development in

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cooperating countries, to translate development into

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economic growth and trade for the United States and cooperating countries, and to prepare future

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24 tion 296(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22

25 C.S.C. 2220a(b)) is amended to read as follows:

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"(b) Accordingly, the Congress declares that, in order

2 to prevent famine and establish freedom from hunger, the 3 following components must be brought together in a co4 ordinated program to increase world food and fiber pro

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"(1) continued efforts by the international agri

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collaboration on crops, livestock, forests, fisheries,

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research collaboration led by United States landgrant and other eligible universities, and involving

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research systems in other countries focused on

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crops, livestock, forests, fisheries, farming resources,

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and food systems, with benefits to the United States

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"(3) transformation of the benefits of global agricultural research and development into increased benefits for United States agriculturally-related industries through establishment of development and

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trade information and service centers, for rural as

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well as urban communities, through extension, coop

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eratively with, and supportive of, existing public and private trade and development related organizations;

"(4) facilitation of universities and their public

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and private partners' participation in programs of

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multilateral banks and agencies which receive United

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States funds, by means which may include United States designation of the use of these funds or through additional complementary funds restricted

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to the use of United States universities and their

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public and private partners;

"(5) expanding learning opportunities about

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sities to United States agriculturalists and their partners from other countries for research, institu

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tion and policy development, extension, training, and

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other programs for global agricultural development,

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