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315. EVILS MOST FELT AT THE CLOSE.

Evils that take leave,
On their departure most of all show evil.

316.
When fortune means to men most good,
She looks upon them with a threat'ning eye.

317. TYRANNY AND WRONG FRUITFUL OF A sceptre, snatch'd with an unruly hand, [EVIL. Must be as boisterously maintain' d as gain'd. And he, that stands upon a slippery place, Makes nice of no vile hold to stay him up.

318. TYRANNY EVER INSECURE. He that steeps his safety in true blood, Shall find but bloody safety and untrue.

319.
O Strong reasons make strong actions.
320. NOVELTY IS POPULAR.

The hearts of subjects
Do kiss the lips of unacquainted change.

321. COMFORTS NOT TO BE DESTROYED. Beings create for comfort to employ In undeserv'd extremes is doubly * evil.

322. DOG-HIS RELUCTANCE TO FIGHT. A Dog that is compelled to fight Snaps at his master that doth tar him on ||.

323. SUPEREROGATION.
To guard a title that was rich before,
To gild refined gold, to paint the lily,
To throw a perfume on the violet,

* Waller, in his Speech before the Parliament, admirably applied thus the Scriptural Aphorism, “ Thou shalt not seethe a Kid in it's Mother's Milk," which the great Lord Mansfield emphatically quoted on the perversion of Law.

1. It appears this cruel depravity was frequent so far back in this, country.

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To smooth the ice, or add another hue
Unto the rainbow, or with taper light
To seek the beauteous eye of Heaven to garnish,
Is wasteful, and ridiculous excess.

324. TRUTH AN ENEMY TO DISGUISE.
Disfiguring the antique well noted face
Of Honesty by an affected pomp
Makes sound opinion sick; and Truth suspected
For putting on so new a fashion'd robe.

325. CORRECTNESS TOO SCRUPULOUS. When workmen strive to do better than well, They do confound their skill in covetousness. 326. FAULT AGGRAVATED BY BAD EXCUSE.

Oftentimes excusing of a fault Doth make the fault the worse by the excuse; As patches set upon a little breach Discredit more in hiding of the flaw Than did the flaw before it was so patched.

327. PHYSIOGNOMY DISCOVERS CRIME, The image of a wicked heinous Fault

a Lives in the eye; and oft the close aspect Betrays the mood of a much troubled breast.

328. DEATH. We cannot hold Mortality's strong hand.

329. He who commands a Nation Hath no commandment o'er the pulse of Life.

330. CRUELTY INSECURE.
There is no sure foundation set on blood;
No certain Lise atchiev'd by others' Death.

331, DISSENTIONS CIVIL.
A State should have no subject enemies
When adverse foreigners affright it's towns
With dreadful pomp of strong Invasion.

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332. PROGNOstics. A foul Sky rarely clears without a storm.

333. CELERITY. The spirit of the Time should teach men speed.

334. TYRANNY NOURISHT BY OBEDIENCE. It is the curse of Kings to be attended By slaves, that take their humours for a warrant. 335. RAGE.

Rage is blind.
336. OPPORTUNITY OF ILL.
How oft the sight of means to do ill deeds
Makes ill deeds done!

337. VIRTUE WILL NOT SERVE TYRANNY. + Virtue and Nobleness will say of Guilt * We will not line the thin bestained cloak With our pure honours, nor attend the foot That leaves the print of blood where e'er it walks. 338. DISTRESS SUPERSEDES COURTESY.

In extremity [words. Men's Griefs and not their Manners prompt their 339. IMPATIENCE-HOW PRIVILEGED,

#Impatience hath it's privilege:
But rarely other privilege allow'd
Than this, to hurt it's master, and none else.
340. LIBERTY AND RIGHT.

* A just man and a free, dares to defend His innocent life against an Emperor.

341. MURTHER BETRAYS ITSELF. * Murther, as hating what itself hath done, Doth lay it open to urge on revenge.

342. TEARS OFTEN DECEITFUL. * Trust not the cunning waters of the eyes, For villainy is not without such rheum: And those long practis'd in it make it seem

Like rivers of remorse or innocence.
! 343. REFORM.

Times may be so sick
That present Medicine must be minister'd,
Or overthrow incurable ensues.

344. CONSISTENCY. Be great in act as you have been in thought.

345. FORTITUDE DOU BLY NECESSARY. Let not the world see fear, and sad mistrust, Govern the motion of a kingly eye.

346. COURAGE TRIUMPHS OVER PÈRIL. Threaten the threatener; and outface the brow Of bragging horror. 347. COURAGE GROWS BY EXÀ MPLE.

$ Inferior eyes, That borrow their behaviours from the great, Grow great by their example, and put on The dauntless spirit of resolution.

348. FORTITUDE. Shew firmness and preventive confidence. 349. LICENTIOUSNESS TO BE CURBED.

Tame the spirit of wild War
That, like a Lion foster'd up at hand,
It
may

lie gently at the foot of Peace*, And be no further harmful than in shew.

350. INDEPENDENCE NATIONAL. IA Nation is not to be property'd To be a secondary at controul, Or instrument and useful serving tool, To any sovereign state throughout the world.

351. INVASION. Never, upon the footing of our Land,

* Exquisite allegoric Painting!

Send fair play orders and make compromise,
Insinuation, parley, and base truce
To arms invasive.

352. BABBLERS.
* Ever hold time too precious to be spent
With babblers.
353. EXTREMES.

Fierce extremes In their continuance will not feel themselves.

354. DEATH-IT'S PROGRESS. Death having prey'd upon the outward parts Leaves them insensible.

355. LIFE-DEPARTING. Often when Life is lingering on it's close, The heart hath one fine string * to stay it by. 356. SORROW TO BE MODERATED.

Let us pay the time but needful woe. 357. GRATITUDE--HER LANGUAGE.

In a kind and tender soul
Fullness of Gratitude would oft give thanks,
And knows no way to do it but by tears.
358. ENGLAND SAFE-BY UNANIMITY,

England never did nor ever shall
Lie at the proud foot of a Conqueror,
But when it first did help to wound itself.
359. ENGLAND'S SECURITY.

Nought shall make us rue,
If England to itself do rest but true.

RICHARD II.
360. JUSTICE.

Let.
The accuser, and the accused, freely speak.

* A widow'd Mother, when in her last illness, said to Sir George Baker, pointing to her Child, “ Ah, Sir, this is the tie that holds me.”

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