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When water-drops have worn the stones of Troy,
And blind oblivion swallow'd cities up,
And mighty states characterless are grated
To dusty nothing; yet let memory,
From false to false, among false maids in love,
Upbraid my falsehood! when they have said-as

false
As air, as water, wind, or sandy earth,
As fox to lamb, as wolf to heifer's calf,
Pard to the hind, or step-dame to her son ;
Yea, let them say, to stick the heart of falsehood,
As false as Cressid.

Pan. Go to, a bargain made : seal it, seal it ; I'll be the witness.-Here I hold your hand; here, my cousin's. If ever you prove false one to another, since I have taken such pains to bring you together, let all pitiful goers-between be call'd to the world's end after my name, call them all-Pandars; let all constant men be Troiluses, all false women Cressids, and all brokers-between Pandars! say, amen.

Tro. Amen.
Cres. Amen.

Pan. Amen. Whereupon I will show you a chamber and a bed, which bed, because it shall not speak of your pretty encounters, press it to death : away.

And Cupid grant all tongue-ty'd maidens here,
Bed, chamber, Pandar to provide this geer!

[Ereunt.

VOL. IX.

SCENE III.

The Grecian Camp.

Enter AGAMEMNON, ULYSSES, DIOMEDES, NES

TOR, AJAX, MENELAUS, and CALCHAS. Cal. Now, princes, for the service I have don

you, The advantage of the time prompts me aloud To call for recompense. Appear it to your mind, That, through the sight I bear in things, to Jove I have abandon’a Troy, left my possession, Incurr'd a traitor's name ; expos'd myself, From certain and possess'd conveniences, To doubtful fortunes; séquest'ring from me all That time, acquaintance, custom, and condition, Made tame and most familiar to my nature; And here, to do you service, am become As new into the world, strange, unacquainted : I do beseech you, as in way To give me now a little benefit, Out of those many register'd in promise, Which, you say, live to come in

my

behalf. Agam. What would'st thou of us, Trojan ? make

demand. Cal. You have a Trojan prisoner, call'd Antenor, Yesterday took; Troy holds him very dear. Oft have you (often have you thanks therefore, ) Desir'd my Cressid in right great exchange,

of taste,

Whom Troy hath still deny'd : But this Antenor,
I know, is such a wrest in their affairs,
That their negociations all must slack,
Wanting his manage ; and they will almost
Give us a prince of blood, a son of Priam,
In change of him : let him be sent, great princes,
And he shall buy my daughter ; and her presence
Shall quite strike off all service I have done,
In most accepted pain?.
Agam.

Let Diomed bear him,
And bring us Cressid bither ; Calchas shall have
What he requests of us.--

-Good Diomed,
Furnish you fairly for this interchange :
Withal, bring word--if Hector will to-morrow
Be answer'd in his challenge: Ajax is ready.

Dio. This shall I undertake ; and 'tis a burden
Which I am proud to bear.

[E.reunt Diomedes and Calchas. Enter Achilles and PATROCLUS, before their Tent.

Ulyss. Achilles stands i'the entrance of his tent:-
Please it our general to pass strangely by him,
As if he were forgot ;-and, princes all,
Lay negligent and loose regard upon him :--
I will come last : 'Tis like, he'll question me,
Why such unplausive eyes are bent, why turn'd on

him:
If so, I have derision med'cinable,
To use between your strangeness and his pride,
Which his own will shall have desire to drinks

It may do good : pride hath no other glass
To show itself, but pride ; for supple knees
Feed arrogance, and are the proud man's fees.

Agam. We'll execute your purpose, and put on
A form of strangeness as we pass along ;-
So do each lord; and either greet him not,
Or else disdainfully, which shall shake him more
Than if not look'd on. I will lead the way.

Achil. What, comes the general to speak with me? You know my mind, I'll fight no more 'gainst Troy.

Agam. What says Achilles ? would he aught with

us?

Nest. Would you, my lord, aught with the general ? Achil.

No. Nest. Nothing, my lord. Agam.

The better.

[Ereunt Agamemnon and Nestor. Achil.

Good day, good day. Men. How do you ? how do you?

[Erit Menelaus. Achil.

What, does the cuckold scorn me? Ajar. How now, Patroclus ? Achil.

Good morrow, Ajax. Ajar.

Ha? Achil. Good morrow. Ajax.

Ay, and good next day too.

[Exit Ajar. Achil. What mean these fellows? know they not

Achilles ?

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