Reinventing Drama: Acting, Iconicity, Performance

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1999 - 226 pagini


Dramatic performance involves an intricate process of rehearsal based upon imagery inherent in the dramatic text. A playwright first invents a drama out of mental imagery. The dramatic text presents the drama as a range of verbal imagery. During rehearsal, the actors cultivate this verbal imagery within themselves. The performance triggers this cultivated mental imagery, thereby enabling the actors to reinvent the drama in the presence of an audience. This interplay of dramatic imagery constitutes the heart of the process of iconicity. The premise of iconicity is that in dramatic performance actors use the same neural architecture that people use in their daily lives to execute events. The core of this neural architecture is the brain's capacity for internally generating, reduplicating, storing, and triggering imagery. The process of iconicity draws on the actor's use of this mental capacity. This book explores the principles of iconicity and develops them as a process for acting and staging dramatic performances.

This book draws together critical and literary theories and neuropsychology to provide a new artistic process for dramatic performance called iconicity. The first part of the book provides a theoretical perspective on the principles of iconicity. Included are discussions of the nature of dramatic performance, the ideology and process of acting, and the importance of emotions to drama. This initial exploraton of iconicity sometimes refers to practice; however, the ideas presented in the first part of the book largely provide a foundation for the second part, which is more practically oriented. The second part gives close attention to the various components of the iconicity process. It explains dramatic structure and identifies and defines the four strands of iconicity: events, dialogue, interactions, and performance. Throughout the volume, numerous plays are used to provide examples of how the iconicity process works.

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Cuprins

INDEXICAL EVENTS AND CHARACTERS
122
SYMBOLIC EVENTS AND CHARACTERS
125
THE SYMBOLIC INTERTEXT
131
THE CONSCIOUSNESS OF ICONICITY
133
The Intermediate Strands of Iconicity
135
THE CLASSES OF DIALOGUE
136
ASPECTS OF DIALOGUE REHEARSAL
139
VOICE AND BODY IN THE DIALOGUE OF TIMBRE AND MIEN
143

Acting and Emotion
67
TERMINOLOGY
69
THE AFFECT THEORY OF EMOTION
71
SCRIPT THEORY
83
IDEOLOGY AND AFFECT
86
The Process of Iconicty
89
The Strands of Events
93
THE ICONICITY PROFILE
94
THE ICONISTICDIRECTOR AND DRAMATIC STRUCTURE
95
THE SEMIOSIS OF DRAMATIC PERFORMANCE EVENTS
98
THE MIMESIS OF EVENTS
101
CULTIVATING MENTAL ICONICITY
102
THE CHARACTERISTICS OF PLAYING EVENTS
103
REHEARSING THE STRAND OF EVENTS
105
THE COMPONENTS OF PLOT
108
Rulers and Features of Dramatic Struture
111
FEATURES OF ICONIC EVENTS
119
VOICE AND GESTURE IN DYNAMIC DIALOGUE
148
VOICE AND GESTURE IN CHORIC DIALOGUE
156
The Strand of Interactions
161
KINESIC COORDINATION AND INTERLOCUTION
165
THE ICONICISTDIRECTOR AND REHEARSAL
168
The Strand of Performance
171
THE PERFORMANCE REHEARSALS
173
INTEGRATING THE STRANDS
181
THE ICONICISTDIRECTOR AND THE PERFORMANCE
182
Postscript to a Process
185
TALENT
186
CATHARSIS
188
BIASES AND IDEALS OF ICONICITY
189
Notes
193
Bibliography
205
Index
215
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Termeni și expresii frecvente

Pasaje populare

Pagina 120 - The weight of this sad time we must obey ; Speak what we feel, not what we ought to say. The oldest hath borne most : we, that are young, Shall never see so much, nor live so long.
Pagina 63 - Is it not monstrous, that this player here, But in a fiction, in a dream of passion, Could force his soul so to his own conceit, That, from her working, all his visage wann'd; Tears in his eyes, distraction in's aspect, A broken voice, and his whole function suiting With forms to his conceit?
Pagina 151 - But I, that am not shap'd for sportive tricks, Nor made to court an amorous looking-glass; I, that am rudely stamp'd and want love's majesty, To strut before a wanton ambling nymph; I, that am curtail'd of this fair proportion, Cheated of feature by dissembling Nature, Deform'd, unfinish'd, sent before my time Into this breathing world, scarce half made up...
Pagina 171 - Make your conversational contribution such as is required, at the stage at which it occurs, by the accepted purpose or direction of the talk exchange in which you are engaged.
Pagina 45 - Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor ; suit the action to the word, the word to the action; with this special observance: that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature ; for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now, was and is, to hold, as 'twere, the mirror up to nature ; to show virtue her own feature, scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and pressure.
Pagina 120 - LEAR: When were you wont to be so full of songs, sirrah? FOOL: I have used" it, nuncle, e'er since thou mad'st thy daughters thy mothers; for when thou gav'st them the rod, and put'st down thine own breeches, [Singing.] Then they for sudden joy did weep, And I for sorrow sung, That such a king should play bo-peep
Pagina 9 - And for this reason God takes away the mind of these men and uses them as his ministers, just as he does soothsayers and godly seers, in order that we who hear them may know that it is not they who utter these words of great price, when •they are out of their wits, but that it is God himself who speaks and addresses us through them.
Pagina 17 - ... secret', an ultimate meaning, to the text (and to the world as text), liberates what may be called an anti-theological activity, an activity that is truly revolutionary since to refuse to fix meaning is, in the end, to refuse God and his hypostases - reason, science, law.
Pagina 45 - Well, do not swear: although I joy in thee, I have no joy of this contract to-night: It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden; Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be Ere one can say 'It lightens.
Pagina 98 - Rule, and the inference of the Result of that rule in that case. For example: — Rule. All men are mortal; Case. Enoch was a man: Result. Enoch was mortal. The cognition of a rule is not necessarily conscious, but is of the nature of a habit, acquired or congenital. The cognition of a case is of the general nature of a sensation; that is to say, it is something which comes up into present consciousness. The cognition of a result is of the nature of a decision to act in a particular way on a given...

Despre autor (1999)

BRUCE G. SHAPIRO is currently a resident dialogue coach for Village Roadshow Production Services at Warner Bros. Movie World Studios in Queensland, Australia. He was previously Head of Performance and Acting at the School of Drama of the Victorian College of the Arts, and the Artist-in-Residence and Lecturer in Acting, Directing, and Dramatic Literature at Tufts University. He has also taught and directed at the Aboriginal Center for the Performing Arts in Brisbane, Australia, the Academy of the Arts at the Queensland University of Technology, Trinity Rep Conservatory, Stonehill College, the MIT Shakespeare Ensemble, the University of Texas at Austin, the University of South Dakota, and the University of Iowa. He is author of numerous articles, and his books include Divine Madness and the Absurd Paradox: Ibsen's Peer Gynt and the Philosophy of Kierkegaard (Greenwood,1990).

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