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butions to periodical literature, and an occasional volume for the instruction of youth, he has so wronged, by his modesty, his reputation and usefulness.*

It was this ardent love of learning for its own sake, and almost withont conscious regard to its ases and advantages, which, fed by long indulgence, had become an absorbing passion, and even threatened to verge into a besetting infirmity. It showed itself in a desire for the accumulation of curious volumes and ancient editions, and for the acquisition of extinct languages. A rare, old book, if it could be procured at any sacrifice short of a principle, was a temptation it was simply impossible for bim to resist. He expended large sums upon his theological library.

His heart warmed, as with instinctive sympathy, towards needy scholars and struggling students, who on applying to him were always sure of a welcome and a helping hand. He lived the life of a student, amid the bustle of a great city, and under the rigorous claims of a laborious profession, and was never happier than when secluded from the world among his treasured books, or discoursing to a congenial friend on his favorite views in theology.

And yet, with all his learning, he was still content to be a papil in the school of godliness, and a scholar at the feet of Jesus. Withont pedantry, without intellectual pride, without soplistry or scepticism, or vain philosophy, he preserved the humility and simplicity of a lowly disciple, through all the temptations of learned investigation, and would have esteemned it the most precious of privileges to have been permitted to devote himself exclusively to sacred and scriptural studies.

If we turn away from these more public actions, and visible traits which make up his ordinary reputation, and penetrate into his private life and experience, we find ourselves in presence of a character which cannot be appreciated from any mere description; it was so simple, equable, and pure. It was the true gentle heart of a child, masked under the gravity of a sage, and expressing itself in a blended kind. ness and decorum, which had the grace of truth itself, and

The most important of those Contributions are Notes on Scripture, printed in the Journal, which we are glad to say are soon to be reissued on behalf of Judge Jones's family, in two volumes, by Messrs. W. S. & A. Martien.

was utterly lost upon all who could not come within the circle of his spiritual sympathies. Though unassuming, he was still content with himself in any human presence. He was incapable of pretence or guile, and shunned display.

But it was his deep and fervent piety which formed his crowning characteristic. Religion in him had acquired the permanence of a habit and the force of a regulating principle. It pervaded his whole character and life, and was carried by him into every position and on all occasions, not as a profession, but because he could not do otherwise, and even in the most worldly associations, though never obtruded, still made itself felt with his very presence as an atmosphere of holiness and a rebuke to sin. All knew that he was a godly man, though no expression of mere personal experience was ever allowed to escape his lips.

It was only when disease and the prospect of death invaded his characteristic reserve and equanimity, that his secret walk with God began to reveal itself with a richness, a tenderness, and beauty that surprised even his most familiar friends. His spirit seemed lingering as upon the very borders of heaven. His heart was full of Christian love towards all who approached him. To his relatives, his friends, his pastor, his fellow-members of the session, he sent messages of kindly counsel and affection.

His only expressed anxiety to live was that he might complete some Scripture studies in which he hoped to embody the matured results of his investigation of Divine truth. Between this holy solicitude and the commencing appreciation of the glory shortly to be revealed, he hovered like the Apostle, in a strait between two, willing to remain, yet having the desire to depart and be with Christ, which is far better. Once, while weighing this latter event as probable, he suddenly exclaimed, with an eye scanning unblenched the whole dread futurity, “ Blessed Saviour! do I not love thee? Show me thy glory!"

It was a deathbed around which was shadowed no terror. Such unclouded tranquillity, such perfect assurance, such strong intelligent faith, such humility, trustfulness, and tender affection, such glimpses of the heavenly glory, made it like the exit of a saint of the olden times of our faith; and when at length the bodily pulse began to wane, the beatific vision so grew upon his spirit as to swallow up all earthly interests and affections, and even illumine the clouds of physical anguish with the prophetic light of that broken utterance, the last ever breathed from his lips on earthA far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory."

How the light of heaven falls in holy tranquillity upon the couch of the dying believer! What a deep, rich calm there ensues upon the turmoil of life and the pains of parting and dissolution! We would not disturb it with one murmur of repining; and though life for a while must seem impoverished, and the earth vacant and lonely, yet we soon learn to thank God for the grace illustrated in the life and death of his servants, and for one more proof that, even in this sinful world, true virtue shall not lose its reward.

With his departure passes away a type of the Christian scholar as singular in its excellence as it is difficult to delineate. It must remain a solitary model of blended learning and goodness that may be revered and cherished, but can. not be perfectly matched or imitated. Some may have approached him in mere erudition ; some may have equalled him in mere piety; a few, under the impulse of an academic or clerical vocation, may have illustrated as signally the harmonious union of those two attainments; but it was his rare merit and, it would seem, his peculiar mission, that, while actively engaged in the legal profession, he should yet make himself a master in theology, and though called to public positions and busied with secular interests, should so thoroughly fuse together the judicial virtues and religious graces, as to present the twofold aspect of a Christian withont a trace of cant or enthusiasm, and a jurist without a taint of duplicity or worldliness.

ART. III.-THEORIES ERRONEOUSLY CALLED SCIENCE, AND

DIVINE REVELATION.

THE STARS AND THE ANGELS. Philadelphia: W. S. & A.

Martien. 1860.

This is one of a number of volumes, lately presented to the public, that aim, by a theory, to solve the phenomena generally of the material and spiritual world, and reconcile the teachings of the Scriptures with the current doctrines of natural science; but which, in fact, instead of contributing to that end, misrepresent and mislead. The work consists

. of two parts. In the first the author treats of matter and the material universe, and endeavors to show that creation, organization, life, growth, death, and all other processes take place by a law of material forces; and in order to that, assuming that all other inaterial worlds are formed of the same species of matter as ours, maintains that the great forces of which organization, life, growth, and other processes are the effects, are light, heat, electricity, and magnetism; and that they act in the same forms and give birth to the same effects in all other worlds as in this :--that the formation of the worlds must therefore have occupied vast periods; that the light of the sun and stars is the effect of combustion, as artificial light is in this world ; that as few and perhaps none of the other orbs have the same degree of heat and density as ours, few or none of them can be supposed to be inhabited by vegetables, animals, and intelligences; that this theory of material forces corroborates the modern geologi. cal doctrine respecting the gradual formation of our world; and finally, that the narrative of the creation by Moses may be interpreted so as to harmonize with this scheme. In the second part he treats of intelligent creatures, and maintains that man is the highest in rank; that angels and all other orders are bodied beings; that corporeal death is the penalty of the sin of angels as well as the sin of men; that light, heat, electricity, and magnetism are the life forces of human beings; and that it is by them, acting þy a law, that organization, life, growth, and death are now wrought, and that the change hereafter of the living from mortal to immortal, and of the dead from corruptible to incorruptible and spiritual, is to take place. He touches also on many other subjects. We shall not follow him through his circle of topics, but shall only point out the groundlessness or error of his leading theories, and show that in place of reconciling the Scriptures with what he denominates science, he arbitrarily divests them of their meaning and authority, and assigns them a signification that suits his philosophy. How clearly it is his aim, not so much to unfold and vindivision so grew upon his spirit as to swallow up all earthly interests and affections, and even illumine the clouds of physical anguish with the prophetic light of that broken utterance, the last ever breathed from his lips on earth“ A far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory.

How the light of heaven falls in holy tranquillity upon the couch of the dying believer! What a deep, rich calm there ensues upon the turmoil of life and the pains of parting and dissolution ! We would not disturb it with one murmur of repining; and though life for a while must seem impoverished, and the earth vacant and lonely, yet we soon learn to thank God for the grace illustrated in the life and death of his servants, and for one more proof that, even in this sinful world, true virtue shall not lose its reward.

With his departure passes away a type of the Christian scholar as singular in its excellence as it is difficult to delineate. It must remain a solitary model of blended learning and goodness that may be revered and cherished, but can. not be perfectly matched or imitated. Some may have approached him in mere erudition ; some may have equalled him in mere piety; a few, under the impulse of an academic or clerical vocation, may have illustrated as signally the harmonious union of those two attainments; but it was his rare merit and, it would seem, his peculiar mission, that, while actively engayed in the legal profession, he should yet make himself a master in theology, and though called to public positions and busied with secular interests, should so thoroughly fuse together the judicial virtues and religious graces, as to present the twofold aspect of a Christian without a trace of cant or enthusiasm, and a jurist without a taint of duplicity or worldliness.

ART. III.—THEORIES ERRONEOUSLY CALLED SCIENCE, AND

DIVINE REVELATION.

THE STARS AND THE ANGELS. Philadelphia: W. S. & A.

Martien. 1860.

This is one of a number of volumes, lately presented to the public, that aim, by a theory, to solve the phenomena

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