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VII. PRACTICAL ADDRESS.

Those that walk in the way that God commands them, shall be preserved from all danger in that way. Wherever Jacob pitched his tents, the Angels of the Lord encamped round about him. Because he feared the Lord, therefore he had no reason to be afraid of Man. Neither Laban nor Esau could hurt Jacob without God's permission. Jacob did not forget the respect that was due to Esau as his elder brother, his offended brother, but he desires that he would forget what is past and forgive his offence, receive him with the love and affection of a brother, who was sorry for his fault and had seen the evil of it. Angry people have generally very good memories; they remember all that has been done against them and take notice of every injury they have received. My dear children, try to forbear, forget and forgive. Always endeavour to make up a quar rel, the sooner it is ended the better, and if you can pacify your angry schoolfellows or brothers and sisters, by giving them a present, do it by all means. It is much better to live

in harmony and peace, than to be continually striving with one another about every trifle and every word. Peace and love, though dearly bought, will be a good bargain to those who buy them. Always pray to God when you have made any one angry with you. Pray to God for forgiveness, and he can soften the hearts of those whom you have offended incline them to forgive you also.

When you pray let it be with humility, acknowledge yourselves unworthy of the least of God's mercies. Try to help yourselves and use your endeavours, aud in the use of the means, God will give you his blessing.

Seek ye the blessing of God, and do not rest satisfied without it. It was far better for Jacob that he obtained the Angel's blessing ra ther than his name. The tree of life is better than the tree of knowledge. Though Jacob obtained the blessing, yet he went halting to his grave. He was lame all the rest of his life. This was to keep him humble and mindful of God. It was before the sun rose that Jacob obtained the blessing. Early in the morning you must pray to God for his blessing.

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With open eyes and joyful heart
I'll welcome in the day,

I'll throw my bed clothes all apart
And rise and kneel and pray.

Jacob was greatly afraid and distressed the `night before, but now his fears are gone, his faith and confidence in God is returned, and instead of waiting for Esau, he pursues his jour ney knowing that he is safe in the hands of God. and that he is walking in the way which God directed him. Put your trust in the Lord, believe his promises. He can preserve you from all your enemies and from every danger. Trust in the Lord and do good, so shalt thou

dwell in the land, and verily thou shalt be fed. O taste and see that the Lord is good. Blessed is the man that trusteth in him, there is no want to them that fear him, they that seek the Lord shall not want any good thing. Amen.

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A HYMN.

Jacob's Return.

"JACOB," arise and leave this land,
No longer here remain;
For thou has tarried long enough,
Therefore go back again.

Behold the Angels of the Lord
Encompass him around,
While Jacob journey'd on his way,
These heav'nly hosts he found.

When Jacob heard that Esau came
With Men in arms arrayed,
In great distress we find him plung'd,
For he was much afraid.

To God he cried, his promise pleads,
And then a present sent,
Commands his Men kind words to use,
That Esau might relent.

That night he wrestled with a Man
Until the break of day
From him a blessing he obtain'd,
Before he went away.

"I will not let thee go," he said,
Till thou hast Jacob blest,
Thus he prevailed with God and Man,
His power the Man confess'd.

When dangers come, seek Jacob's God,
And offer fervent prayer,
You shall be safe, the Lord shall keep,
Thy soul from ev'ry snare.

R.

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LECTURE XXXII.

THE MEETING

BETWEEN ESAU AND

JACOB; OR THE RECONCILED

BROTHERS.

GEN. 33. 4. And Esau ran to meet him, and embraced him, and fell on his neck, and kissed him: and they wept.

If any of you, my dear young friends, had a brother whom you had not seen for twenty years, would you not be very glad to hear that he was coming home? Yes. I am sure you would. Suppose this brother had threatened to take away your life, could you forgive him, could you meet him with the love and affection of a brother? Would you remind him of his former unkind and cruel threatening? Oh! no, that I think you would not. It would all be forgotten, you would be so glad to meet each other after so long an absence. Suppose you had done all that lay in your power to pacify this brother, and to produce a reconciliation, would you not have some reason to hope that he was no longer angry with you. But

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