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generally to Filipinos permanently resident in the United States. Since such veterans would have to be residents of this country previous to naturalization, they would, for the most part, be covered by the general provisions of the bill conferring naturalization benefits upon native-born Filipinos permanently resident in the United States. Moreover, I do not approve of the granting of what seems to be a special privilege to a special group when there may be others just as deserving. For these reasons I recommend the deletion from H. R. 4229 of the veterans' provisions.

One other suggestion which I offer is that the phrase "native-born citizen of the Philippine Islands” be substituted for the phrase "native-born Filipino." The term “Filipino” has no well-defined meaning and would cause administrative difficulties. Under Philippine laws, a person born in the Philippines is not necessarily a citizen of the Philippines. It would seem desirable to restrict the benefits of the legislation under consideration to persons who were Philip pine citizens at birth.

I have been advised by the Bureau of the Budget that there is no objection to the submission of this report to your committee. Sincerely yours,

HAROLD L. ICKES, Secretary of the Interior.

STATE OF WASHINGTON, DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Olympia, March 8, 1944. Hon. SOUTH TRIMBLE,

Clerk of the House, Washington, D. C. DEAR SIR: At the direction of the State Legislature of the State of Washing. ton, in extraordinary session, I have the honor to transmit the attached senate joint memorial No. 1. Respectfully yours,

BELLE REEVES, Secretary of State. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

State of Washington, Department of State: To all to whom these presents shall come, I, Belle Reeves, secretary of state of the State of Washington and custodian of the seal of said State, do hereby certify that the annexed is a true and correct copy of senate joint memorial No. 1, passed by the twenty-eighth session of the State legislature, in extraordinary session, on March 4, 1944, now on file in this office.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed hereto the seal of the State of Washington. Done at the capitol, at Olympia, this 8th day of March A. D. 1944. [SEAL]

BELLE REEVES, Secretary of State.

SENATE JOINT MEMORIAL No. 1

To the Honorable Franklin D. Roosevelt, President of the United States, and to

the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States, in Congress

assembled: We, your memorialists, the Senate and the House of Representatives of the State of Washington, in legislative session assembled, most respectfully represent and petition as follows:

Whereas United States Representative Randolph, of West Virginia, has introduced a bill in Congress, being H. R. 4003, which would grant full citizenship to Filipinos resident in the United States prior to May 1, 1934, upon certain conditions therein named; and

Whereas under the present law the Filipinos are considered aliens for certain purposes but owe allegiance to the United States and by their services in the armed forces of the United States and by their services in industry and their purchase of War bonds and full cooperation in the war effort have demonstrated their patriotism, loyalty, and allegiance to the United States; and

Whereas H. R. 4003 is intended to clarify this anomalous situation and to settle legal, racial, and marital status of resident Filipinos.

Now, therefore, your memorialists pray that the Congress of the United States specially pass and that the President sign H. R. 4003.

Be it resowed, That copies of this memorial be immediately transmitted to the Honorable Franklin Roosevelt, President of the United States, the Secretary of the United States Senate, the Clerk of the United States House of Representatives, and to each Member of the Congress from the State of Washington. Passed the senate March 3, 1944.

(Signed) VICTOR A. MEYERS,

President of the Senate. Passed the house March 4, 1944.

(Signed) EDWARD P. REILLY,

Speaker of the House.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES,

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE,

Washington, D. C., November 21, 1944. Hon. SAMUEL DICKSTEIN, Chairman, Committee on Immigration and Naturalization,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. DEAR CONGRESSMAN DICKSTEIN : In the absence of the Resident Commissioner of the Philippines to the United States, Brig. Gen. Carlos P. Romulo, I have the honor to submit herewith for the consideration of the House Committee on Immigration and Naturalization the various telegrams and letters received by us from the officers of the Filipino communities in the United States and Alaska, endorsing the passage of legislation to naturalize Filipinos.

In this connection, permit me to say that the Filipinos do not ask for more privileges than what this country ordinarily gives to people of other countries residing in the United States.

In the Philippines full protection is accorded the interests of American citizens by the Commonwealth Government. Section 1 (17) of the Ordinance Appended to the Constitution of the Philippines provides that “citizens and corporations of the United States shall enjoy in the Commonwealth of the Philippines all the civil rights of the citizens and corporations, respectively, thereof."

American citizens may be naturalized in the Philippines without any special requirements.

Although Filipinos are not citizens of the United States, they owe allegiance to this country. It is reasonable, therefore, to suppose that the Congress of the United States would not want to discriminate against them in favor of other people who owe no allegiance whatever to the United States.

As a matter of fairness and justice to a people whose loyalty to the United States has remained whole and unimpaired in this present war, and in consideration of the just and equal, if not preferential, treatment given American citizens in the Philippines by the Commonwealth Government, it is sincerely and earnestly hoped that the Committee on Immigration and Naturalization will report favorably a bill to naturalize Filipinos who have established permanent residence in the United States. Sincerely yours,

(Signed) JAIME HERNANCEZ,

Secretary of Finance. Enclosures : Letters and telegrams.

STOCKTON, CALIF., November 21, 1944. MANUEL ADEVA,

Chief, Nationals Division, Commonwealth of the Philippines: Naturalization as American citizens has been the most desired prize. [sic] of the Filipino residents of the United States for many years. This desire has been unanimously endorsed at every annual convention of the Filipino intercommunity organization of the Western States which has 35 Filipino communities under its jurisdiction. In their plea to Congress for citizenship the Filipinos are motivated by the wish to be recognized as free, normal persons with right of suffrage, protected in the security of making a decent livelihood, the same rights and privileges Americans received from the Philippine Government before Pearl Harbor. That the Filipino residents of this country deserve American citizenship no fair minded person can deny. Their record in the armed forces and defense industries prove their loyalty and patriotism and for respecting law and order they have no peer. The passage of the bill to naturalize Filipinos will be a grant of justice long delayed to a deserving and worthy people.

ANTONIO A. GONZALES, President, Filipino Intercommunity Organization of the Western States.

NEWARK, N. J., November 21, 1944. RESIDENT COMMISSIONER OF THE PHILIPPINES,

House of Representatives: I convey the prayers and hopes of our people in New Jersey, the successful and eventual passage on naturalization of Filipinos by the House Committee Wednesday morning, November 22.

GEROME GIRON, President, Filipino National Council.

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., November 21, 1944. MANUEL ADEVA,

Philippine Resident Commissioner's Office: Filipino community of Almeda, Contra Costa counties endorse bill for the naturalization of Filipinos.

A. C. LOPEZ, President.

YUMA, ARIZ., November 21, 1944. THE RESIDENT COMMISSIONER OF THE PHILIPPINES TO THE UNITED STATES :

We are in favor for the naturalization of Filipinos. We wish your success to fight for that bill.

JUAN ORINES, President.

November 20, 1944. PHILIPPINE RESIDENT COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C.: In response to your telegram we respectfully send the following: Whereas the majority of Filipinos residing in the Yakima Valley are veteran farmers with enormous investments in farm machinery and equipment, and whereas a considerable number of Filipino families are permanently established here, and therefore we request the fullest support and cooperation of the committee members on Filipino immigration and naturalization bills.

FILIPINO COMMUNITY OF YAKIMA VALLEY,
Roy BALDOZ, President.

WATSONVILLE, CALIF., November 18, 1944. MANUEL ADEVA,

Chief, Nationals Division, Washington, D. C.:
Action on immigration and naturalization of Filipinos very favorable.

FILIPINOS COMMISSION OF WATSONVILLE, CALIF.,
M. SULAY, President.

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., November 19, 1944. Hon. MANUEL A. ADEVA, Chief, Nationals Division, Philippine Resident Commissioner Office,

Washington, D. C.: The Filipino community of San Francisco vigorously urges immediate approval of immigration and naturalization bill as a token of recognition to the loyalty of our people to the American flag.

NICK C. NICHOLAS, President.

BRAWLEY, CALIF., November 18, 1944. MANUEL A. ADEVA, Chief, Nationals Division, Office of Philippines Commission,

Washington, D. C.: Consulted various leaders and unanimously in favor of the approval of bills to naturalize Filipinos.

MOISES I. ARCIAGA, President, Filipino Community.

SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIF., November 19, 1944. PHILIPPINE RESIDENT COMMISSIONER,

Washington, D. C.: DEAR MR. ADEVA: Received your telegram. The Filipino Community of San Luis Obispo sends warm good wishes and we look forward to the day when naturalization law be passed. Sincerely yours,

TED FERMIN.

BOSTON, MASS. MANUAL A. ADEVA,

Chief, Nationals Division, Washington, D. C.: Reference your telegram November 17, resident Filipinos in New England urgently petition for the immediate passage of bill now pending in Congress for naturalization of Filipinos. Business and family interests of these loyal Filipinos demand equal legal rights and protection under the democratic government.

MANUEL M. MORALES, Chairman, Filipino Executive Committee for New England.

GUADALUPE, CALIF. MANUEL A. ADEVA,

Chief, Nationals Division, Washington, D. C.: Please be advised that the Filipino community of Santa Maria Valley and vicinity is very much in favor of the bill authorizing the naturalization of Filipinos. We earnestly hope that it will be passed by the Senate and House of Representatives. Very truly yours,

FILIPINO COMMUNITY, GERONEMO ARIA.

PHOENIX, ARIZ., November 19, 1944. PHILIPPINE RESIDENT COMMISSIONER :

Filipinos in Arizona are desirous becoming eligible to American citizenship. Passage of citizenship bill by Congress will be deeply appreciated.

RAY CAPONO, President, Filipino Council of Phoenix.

PHLADELPHIA, PA., November 19, 1944. OFFICE OF THE RESIDENT COMMISSIONER OF THE PHILIPPINES :

The Filipino Association of Philadelphia, Inc., unanimously endorses the passage of legislation to naturalize Filipinos in the United States as recognition of their tested loyalty to America.

A. E. RAMIREZ, Secretary.

KETCHIKAN, ALASKA, November 20, 1944. MANUEL A. ADEVA, Chief Nationals Division, Philippine Commission,

Washington, D. C.: Mass meeting today unanimously on record favoring changes be made naturalization laws thereby allowing Filipinos to become United States citizens.

SALVADOR DEL FIERRO,
Chairman, Filipino Circle.

FRESNO, CALIF., November 18, 1944. Hon. MANUEL A. ADEVA,

Chief, Nationals Division, Philippine Resident Commissioner Office: We Filipinos of Fresno and vicinity endorse on bills to naturalize Filipinos. We pledge for the enactment of these bills.

RICARDO Q. CAMPOS, President of Filipino Community of Fresno.

NEW YORK, N. Y., November 21, 1944. MANUEL A. ADEVA,

Chief, Nationals Division, Washington, D. C.: The council passed this resolution :

"Whereas Filipino communities all over the United States have made themselves a vital part of American life by contributing their best and whereas Filipinos are fighting on all fronts, are in war industries and in American ships sailing the seven seas in defense of the American way of life in this global war, and whereas Filipinos although owing allegiance to the United States are denied the rights of citizenship: Therefore be it

"Resolved by the Filipino National Council, New York, That it strongly endorse the Filipino naturalization bill now pending in Congress."

GENE G. MANUAL, Chairman, Filipino National Council.

EL CENTRO, CALIF., November 18, 1944. RESIDENT COMMISSIONER OF THE PHILIPPINES TO THE UNITED STATES,

Washington, D. C.: Filipinos of Imperial Valley desire to see if pass the naturalization of Filipinos of the United States.

PRESIDENT PEDRO F. OBRA, Filipino Commissioner of Imperial Valley.

SEATTLE, WASH., November 21, 1944. THE COMMITTEE ON NATURALIZATION OF FILIPINOS,

Care Madeva, Washington, D. O.: Filipino community of Seattle and vicinity urge committee in United States Congress convening Wednesday, November 22, 1944, to pass bills naturalizing Filipinos in America, Hawaii, and Alaska. Sincerely yours,

Miss MAXINE GONONG, President.

DETROIT, Mich., November 20, 1944. MANUEL ADEVA,

Washington, D. C.: The Filipinos in Michigan are in favor of the bill on naturalization of Filipinos. It is the best gift America can offer us. Our faith and loyalty to America has been proven, therefore we are worthy to be naturalized, and I am sure we will become good American citizens.

JOHN A. CABAUATAN, Chairman, Filipino Executive Council of Michigan.

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FILIPINO TRIANGULAR CLUB,

Kansas City, Mo., November 19, 1944. Mr. MANUEL A. ADEVA,

Chief, Nationals Division, Washington, D. C. DEAR MR. ADEVA: Am very glad to have received your telegram informing about the hearings next Wednesday, November 22, of bills to naturalize Filipinos by the House Committee on Immigration and Naturalization. It certainly is good news and hope Congress will give favorable action. I am equally aware that the members of the Triangular Club unanimously approve the passage of such a bill.

I read a copy of the eloquent speech of our Resident Commissioner, Brig. Gen. Carlos P. Romulo, in the House of Representatives, on September 21, 1944. His presentations are plenty enough for which am entirely in accord. I may add by observing that if there is any such thing as fairness or justice, for which as its champion America is world renowned, I have an abiding faith that Congress will not now deny the Filipinos the privilege to become naturalized citizens, which other people now enjoy. To Mother America their loyalty is no less ardent, as

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