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The Flowers of God..

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Feathered Tribe-Lions, Tigers, and Hyenas

of the........

Five Points.....

213 .169, 267, 376 Forefathers, Homes of our....... 407 Friends, Our Two-A Matrimonial Sketch... 242 Germany, Adventures in the Snow in......... 229 Gold-Digging Mania, Final Catastrophe of.. 537 Gospels, Undesigned Coincidences in.......... 445 Guizot, The Wife of-Her Life and Writings 145

221 Gutta Percha, Growth and Introduction of... 504

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THE

NATIONAL MAGAZINE.

JANUARY, 1853.

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IN

JOHN M'CLINTOCK, D. D.

N presenting in these columns, as we frequently shall, portraits of living and familiar men, it is not our design to accompany them with many biographical details, much less with elaborate estimates of character. This would be a delicate and an invidious task, especially in comparatively youthful cases, where the public career of the subject can, as yet, admit of but a partial judgment. It is our purpose rather to give such characters a sort of visible or personal introduction to our readers, and the letter-press accompaniment of the "likeness," except in very advanced examples, must be barely sufficient for such an introduction.

In introducing Dr. M'Clintock to the goodly company of our readers, we must VOL. II, No. 1.-A

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LIBRARY

disclaim any responsibility for his presentation dress. Were it possible, we would whisper in each ear that we do not really like his appearance. The original is a great deal preferable to the similitude. The real doctor presents an aspect of much more physical importance, much better digestion, and much more bonhomie, and is altogether a more "likely" man than the engraved doctor. Albeit, our artist is not to blame-he has "followed copy" faithfully. The "copy" was an original daguerreotype, approved by the doctor's most intimate friends; and they must bear the blame, if any is alleged.

Dr. M'Clintock is a native of Philadelphia, and is, we believe, about thirty-eight years of age. He studied at the Wes

leyan University under the late President Fisk, but graduated at the University of Pennsylvania, in his natiyey, from which institution he also received the degree of D. D.

On completing his collegiate studies, he entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in the New-Jersey Conference. He had occupied, however, but one two pastoral" appointments," when he was called to a professorship in Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa. He was only twenty-three years of age at this fime, but his ripe scholarship fully justified his appointment. A writer in the Southern Christian Advocate, who seems to be quite familiar with Dr. M'Clintock's early life,

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"On reaching Carlisle, he was sent to the late Rev. Asbury Roszel,, then principal of the preparatory department. It was twilight, and Asbury was engaged in fixing his lamps. Hearing a knock, he said, gruffly, Come in.' Seeing a slight, youthful figure enter the room: 'Sit down till I am through here,' said he, supposing it was some 'sub' come to enter. When through, he turned and said, abruptly enough, Now, sir, what do you want?' You may conceive his astonishment, when he found that this youth, with not much more than a boy's down on his lip, and whom he, doubtless, had expected to have the pleasure of drubbing occasionally, was to rank him by the occupancy of a professor's chair. Those must have been great days at Dickinson, when Durbin, then Emory, Allen, M'Clintock, Caldwell, Baird, and others, were there together. What changes have taken place in that little circle! Durbin, Missionary Secretary; Allen, President of Girard College; Baird, in the Smithsonian Institute; Emory and Caldwell in the grave; and M'Clintock filling one of the most responsible and influential posts in the gift of the Church."

While at Carlisle, Dr. M'Clintock occupied, with marked success, different professional chairs. He formed there also habits of assiduous and systematic literary labor, which have had no slight effect on his subsequent accomplished scholarship. His studies were usually continued till midnight, or later. He has since paid the penalty of such indiscretion in the sufferings of ill health, sufferings which, however, more fortunately

in his case than in many others, came upon him early enough to admit of successful treatment. A voyage to Europe and more self-indulgent habits, have quite renovated his constitution, and still prom ise him a physique of quite aldermanic or episcopal pretensions. He might already take his stand, without much apology, among the "florid friars" of the "good old times."

He mastered the German during his residence at Carlisle, and, jointly with Professor Blumenthal, translated in 1846 and 1847 Neander's Life of Christ. His most important literary works however were, during this period, a series of Greek and Latin text-books, which he commenced in connection with Professor Crooks. Four of them have been published, viz. :-First and Second Books in Latin, and First and Second Books in Greek. We have no hesitancy in pronouncing these volumes the best elementary books in Latin and Greek with which we are acquainted. They are based substantially on the method of Ollendorf, and are prepared with an exactness and discrimination which cannot fail to be prized by the critical teacher.

While engaged in these professional labors, Dr. M'Clintock was also a frequent contributor to the "Methodist Quarterly Review." His articles were distinguished by their sound sense, good taste, and polished style.

At the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, held at Pittsburgh in 1848, he was elected editor of that publication, and, at the session of 1852, was reelected almost unanimously. The periodical has assumed a commanding rank under his editorial care. It has won for itself high consideration both in this country and in Europe, and good judges hesitate not to pronounce it among the very first Quarterlies of the day.

Thus much of biographic data respecting Dr. M'Clintock. According to our preliminary remarks we might stop here, and we would do so, were it not that another hand affords us some observations on more delicate points. The writer already quoted from the Southern Christion Advocate, gives the following "pen and ink portrait" of the doctor, in regard to which we must resuggest the qualification already given, respecting our engraved portrait. "He is,” says this writer,

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