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All birds, so much the very sight of you,-
The thought “I see her,"—makes me happy-

minded.

I ran to meet you, as a traveller
Gets from the sun under a shady beech.
And would to heaven our loves were both alike!

All times to come should have us in their songs.

They say there were two lovers formerly,
Who loved so ; one the courter, one the courted;
Yet both felt equally at last. 'Ah, those
Were golden times, when the belov'd loved too.
Would it were so again, oh father Saturn,
Oh
ye

immortal gods, who grow not old ;
And that some one, two centuries afterwards,
Should tell me so, in the unquittable shades !
That love of your's, sweet youth, and your's, sweet

maid,

Are in all mouths. But let the Gods above
Do what seems good to them. Myself, meanwhile,
Shall feel no marks of falsehood on my nose ; *
For if my love can wound me now and then,
She does but make it up to me directly
With double balm; and I depart, o'er-recompensed.

Blest be your homes, ye Megaraan people,
Stoutest of rowers,—who above all guests
Honoured Diocles with his amorous fame.
Still at his tomb, assembling with the spring,
The youth contend to get the prize in kissing;
And she, who sweetliest presses lip to lip,
Goes home, with crowns quite bending, to her

mother.

* A popular superstition, like the modern one respecting blisters on the tongue.

Happy the judge, who has to taste those kisses ! One girl, who gained the crowns, it is well known, Possessed a mouth, red as those Lydian rubies, With which assayers try adulterate gold.

THE SYRACUSAN GOSSIPS;

OR,

THE FEAST OF ADONIS.

GORGO, EUNOE, PRAXINOE, OLD WOMAN, AND TWO MEN.

SCENE, AT ALEXANDRIA, IN ÆGYPT.

Gor. Praxinoe within ?

Eun.

Why Gorgo, dear,
How late you are! Yes, she's within.
Prax.

What no !

And so you are come at last! A seat here, Eunoe,

And set a cushion.

Eun.

There is one.

[blocks in formation]

Gor. Oh, what a thing's a spirit! Do you know I've scarcely got alive to you, Praxinoe, There's such a crowd, such heaps of four-horse

chariots, And creaking shoes, and military cloaks, And then you

live such an immense way off. Prax. Why 'twas his shabby doing; he would take This hole that he calls house, at the world's end. 'Twas all to spite me, and to part us two.

Gor. Don't talk so of your husband, there's a dear, Before the little one ; see how he looks at you.

Prax. There, cheer up, child; cheer up, Zopyrion,

sweet; I don't mean your papa.

Gor. (aside.) He understands though, By the Adorable! (aloud.) No, nice papa!

Prax. Well, this papa (softly, let us talk softly)

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