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Stan. Unless for that, my liege, I cannot guess.

K. Rich. Unless for that he comes to be your liege, You cannot guess wherefore the Welshman comes. Thou wilt revolt, and fly to him, I fear.

Stan. No, mighty liege, therefore mistrust me not.
K. Rich. Where is thy power then, to beat him

back?
Where be thy tenants, and thy followers?
Are they not now upon the western shore,
Safe-conducting the rebels from their ships ?
Stan. No, my good lord, my friends are in the

north K. Rich. Cold friends to me: What do they in

the north, When they should serve their sovereign in the west? Stan. They have not been commanded, mighty

king:
Pleaseth your majesty to give me leave,
I'll muster up my friends; and meet your grace,
Where, and what time, your majesty shall

please. K. Rich. Ay, ay, thou wouldst be gone to join

with Richmond: I will not trust you, sir. Stan.

Most mighty sovereign, You have no cause to hold my friendship doubtful; I never was, nor never will be false. K. Rich. Well, go, muster men. But, hear you

leave behind Your son, George Stanley; look your heart be firm, Or else his head's assurance is but frail. Stan. So deal with him, as I prove true to you.

[Exit Stanley. Enter a Messenger. Mess. My gracious sovereign, now in Devonshire, As I by friends am well advertised, Sir Edward Courtney, and the haughty prelate,

Bishop of Exeter, his elder brother,
With many more confederates, are in arms.

Enter another Messenger. 2 Mess. In Kent, my liege, the Guildfords are in

arms; And every hour more competitors * Flock to the rebels, and their power grows strong.

Enter another Messenger. 3 Mess. My lord, the arıny of great BuckinghamK. Rich. Out on ye, owls! nothing but songs

of death?

[He strikes him. There, take thou that, till thou bring better news.

3 Mess. The news I have to tell your majesty,
Is,—that, by sudden floods and fall of waters,
Buckingham's army is dispers’d and scatter'd;
And he himself wander'd away alone,
No man knows whither.
K. Rich.

O, I cry you mercy:
There is my purse, to cure that blow of thine.
Hath any well-advised friend proclaim'd
Reward to him that brings the traitor in?
3 Mess. Such proclamation hath been made, my

liege.

Enter another Messenger. 4 Mess. Sir Thomas Lovel, and lord marquis

Dorset, 'Tis said, my liege, in Yorkshire are in arms. But this good comfort bring I to your highness,The Bretagne navy is dispers’d by tempest: Richmond, in Dorsetshire, sent out a boat

more competitors--] That is, more opponents to us, or rather associates with them.

Unto the shore, to ask those on the banks,
If they were his assistants, yea, or no;
Who answer'd him, they came from Buckingham
Upon his party: he, mistrusting them,
Hois'd sail, and made his course again for Bretagne.

K. Rich. March on, march on, since we are up

in arms;

If not to fight with foreign enemies,
Yet to beat down these rebels here at home.

Enter Catesby.
Cate. My liege, the duke of Buckingham is taken,
That is the best news; That the earl of Richmond
Is with a mighty power landed at Milford,
Is colder news, but yet they must be told.”
K. Rich. Away towards Salisbury; while we rea-

son here,
A royal battle might be won and lost:-
Some one take order, Buckingham be brought
To Salisbury ;---the rest march on with me.

[Exeunt.

SCENE V.

A Room in Lord Stanley's House.

Enter STANLEY and Sir CHRISTOPHER URSWICK.? Stan. Sir Christopher, tell Richmond this from

me:

1

'they must be told.) This was the language of Shakspeare's time, when the word news was often considered as plural.

while we reason here,] i. e. while we talk here. 2 Sir Christopher Urswick.] The person, who is called Sir Christopher here, and who has been styled so in the Dramatis Personce of all the impressions, was Christopher Urswick, a bachelor in divinity; and chaplain to the Countess of Richmond, who had intermarried with the Lord Stanley. This priest, the

Bishop of Exeter, his elder brother,
With many more confederates, are in arms.

Enter another Messenger. 2 Mess. In Kent, my liege, the Guildfords are in

arms;

8

And every hour more competitors
Flock to the rebels, and their power grows strong.

Enter another Messenger. 3 Mess. My lord, the arıny of great BuckinghamK. Rich. Out on ye, owls! nothing but songs of death?

[He strikes him. There, take thou that, till thou bring better news.

3 Mess. The news I have to tell your majesty,
Is,-that, by sudden floods and fall of waters,
Buckingham's army is dispers’d and scatter'd;
And he himself wander'd away alone,
No man knows whither.
K. Rich.

O, I cry you mercy:
There is my purse, to cure that blow of thine.
Hath any well-advised friend proclaim'd
Reward to him that brings the traitor in?
3 Mess. Such proclamation hath been made, my

liege.

Enter another Messenger. 4 Mess. Sir Thomas Lovel, and lord marquis

Dorset, 'Tis said, my liege, in Yorkshire are in arms. But this good comfort bring I to your highness,The Bretagne navy is dispers’d by tempest: Richmond, in Dorsetshire, sent out a boat

8

- more competitors--] That is, more opponents to us, or rather associates with them.

Unto the shore, to ask those on the banks,
If they were his assistants, yea, or no;
Who answer'd him, they came from Buckingham
Upon his party: he, mistrusting them,
Hois'd sail, and made his course again for Bretagne.

K. Rich. March on, march on, since we are up

in arms;

If not to fight with foreign enemies,
Yet to beat down these rebels here at home.

Enter CATESBY.
Cate. My liege, the duke of Buckingham is taken,
That is the best news; That the earl of Richmond
Is with a mighty power landed at Milford,
Is colder news, but yet they must be told.
K. Rich. Away towards Salisbury; while we rea-

son here,
A royal battle might be won and lost:-
Some one take order, Buckingham be brought
To Salisbury ;-the rest march on with me.

(Exeunt.

SCENE V.

A Room in Lord Stanley's House.

Enter STANLEY and Sir CHRISTOPHER URSWICK.? Stan. Sir Christopher, tell Richmond this from

me:

'they must be told.] This was the language of Shakspeare's time, when the word news was often considered as plural.

while we reason here,] i. e. while we talk here. 2 Sir Christopher Urswick.) The person, who is called Sir Christopher here, and who has been styled so in the Dramatis Persona of all the impressions, was Christopher Urswick, a bachelor in divinity; and chaplain to the Countess of Richmond, who had intermarried with the Lord Stanley. This priest, the

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