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RECEPTION AT PITTSBURG.

INTRODUCTORY NOTE.

MR. WEBSTER arrived at Pittsburg on the evening of the 4th of July accompanied by a numerous cavalcade of citizens. He was immediately waited on by a committee, with the following letter :

“ To The Hon. DANIEL WEBSTER.

Pittsburg, July 4, 1833. “SIR, - At a meeting of the citizens of Pittsburg, the undersigned were appointed a committee to convey to you a cordial welcome, and an assurance of the exalted sense which is entertained of your character and public services.

“The feeling is one which pervades our whole community, scorning any narrower discrimination than that of lovers of our sacred Union, and admirers of the highest moral and intellectual qualities, steadily and triumphantly devoted to the noblest purposes.

" The resolutions under which the committee act indicate no particular form of tribute, but contain only an earnest injunction to seek the best mode by which to manifest the universal recognition of your claim to the admiration and gratitude of every American citizen. It will be deeply mortifying to us, if our execution of this trust shall fail adequately to represent the enthusiastic feeling in which it had its origin.

“ The committee will have the honor of waiting on you in person, at such an hour as you may please to designate, with a view to ascertain how they can best fulfil the purposes of their appointment. It will be very gratifying if your convenience will permit you to partake of a public dinner at any period during your stay. “ We have the honor to be, with the highest respect, &c.

JAMES ROSS,
BENJAMIN BAKEWELL,

SAMUEL P. DARLINGTON,
CHARLES AVERY,

MICHAEL TIERNAN,
WILLIAM WADE,

SAMUEL FAHNESTOCK,

THOMAS BAKEWELL,
GEORGE MILTENBERGER,

WALTER H. LOWRIE,
ISAAC LIGHTNER,

WILLIAM W. IRWIN,
SYLVANUS LATHROP,

ROBERT S. CASSAT,

CORNELIUS DARRAGH, ALEX. BRACKENRIDGE,

BENJAMIN DARLINGTON,
WILLIAM ROBINSON, JUN.

NEVILLE B. CRAIG,
GEORGE A. COOK,

WILSON MCCANDLES,
W. W. FETTERMAN,
SAMUEL ROSEBURGH,

CHARLES SHALER,
WILLIAM MACKEY,
JAMES JOHNSTON,

CHARLES H. ISRAEL."

RICHARD BIDDLE,

SAMUEL PETTIGREW,

JOHN ARTHURS,

OWEN ASHTON,

THOMAS SCOTT,

To this letter Mr. Webster returned the following reply :

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" Pittsburg, July 5, 1833. “GENTLEMEN, - I hardly know how to express my thanks for the hos. pitable and cordial welcome with which the citizens of Pittsburg are disposed to receive me on this my first visit to their city. The terms in which you express their sentiments, in your letter of yesterday, far transcend all merits of mine, and can have their origin only in spontaneous kindness and good feeling. I tender to you, Gentlemen, and to the meeting which you represent, my warmest acknowledgments. I rejoice sincerely to find the health of the city so satisfactory ; and I reciprocate with all the people of Pittsburg the most sincere and hearty good wishes for their prosperity and happiness. Long may it continue what it now is, an abode of comfort and hospitality, a refuge for the well-deserving from all nations, a model of industry, and an honor to the country.

“ It is my purpose, Gentlemen, to stay a day or two among you, to see such of your manufactories and public institutions as it may be in my power to visit. I most respectfully pray leave to decline a public dinner, but shall have great pleasure in meeting such of your fellow-citizens as may desire it, in the most friendly and unceremonious manner. “ I am, Gentlemen, with very true regard, yours,

« DANIEL WEBSTER. “ To Hon. James Ross and others,

Gentlemen of the Committee."

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In deference to Mr. Webster's wishes, the idea of a formal dinner was abandoned; but, as there was a general desire for some collective expression of public esteem, it was determined to invite him to meet the citizens in a spacious grove, at four o'clock on the afternoon of the 8th. Refresh. ments of a plain kind were spread around, under the charge of the committee; but the tables could serve only as a nucleus to the multitude. His Honor the Mayor called the company to order, and addressed them , as follows:

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“ I have to ask, Gentlemen, your attention for a few moments.

“ We are met here to mark our sense of the extraordinary merits of a distinguished statesman and public benefactor. At his particular request, every thing like parade or ceremonial has been waived; and, in conse. quence, he has been the better enabled to receive, and to reciprocate, the hearty and spontaneous expression of your good-will. I am now desired to attempt, in your name, to give utterance to the universal feeling around me.

“ Gentlemen, we are this day citizens of the United States. The Union is safe. Not a star has fallen from that proud banner around which our affections have so long rallied. And when, with this delighful assurance, we cast our eyes back upon the eventful history of the last year, - when we recall the gloomy apprehensions, and perhaps hopeless despondency,

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which came over us, - who, Gentlemen, can learn, without a glow of enthusiasm, that the great champion of the Constitution, that DANIEL Webster, is now in the midst of us. To his mighty intellect, the nation, with one voice, confided its cause, - of life or death. Shall there be withheld from the triumphant advocate of the nation a nation's gratitude ? Ours, Gentlemen, is a government not of force, but of opinion. The rea. son of the people must be satisfied before a call to arms. The mass of our peaceful and conscientious citizens cannot, and ought not, except in a clear case, to be urged to abandon the implements of industry for the sword and the bayonet. This consideration it is that imparts to intellece tual preeminence in the service of truth its incalculable value. And hence the preciousness of that admirable and unanswerable exposition, which has put down, once and for ever, the artful sophisms of nullification.

“If, Gentlemen, we turn to other portions of the public history of our distinguished guest, it will be found that his claims to grateful acknowl. edgment are not less imposing. The cause of domestic industry, of internal improvement, of education, of whatever, in short, is calculated to render us a prosperous, united, and happy people, has found in him a watchful and efficient advocate. Nor is it the least of his merits, that to our gallant Navy Mr. Webster has been an early, far-sighted, and.

· per severing friend. Our interior position cannot render us cold and unobservant on this point, whilst the victory of Perry yet supplies to us a proud and inspiring anniversary. And such is the wonderful chain of · mutual dependence which binds our Union, that, in the remotest corner of the West, the exchangeable value of every product must depend on the security with which the ocean can be traversed.

“Gentlemen, I have detained you too long; yet I will add one word. I do but echo the language of the throngs that have crowded round Mr. Webster in declaring, that the frank and manly simplicity of his character and manners has created a feeling of personal regard which no mere intellectual ascendency could have secured. We approached him with admiration for the achievements of his public career, never supposing for a moment that our hearts could have aught to do in the matter; we shall part as from a valued friend, the recollection of whose virtues cannot pass away."

MR. WEBSTER then addressed the assembly as follows:

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