Meaning in History: The Theological Implications of the Philosophy of History

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University of Chicago Press, 15 apr. 1957 - 257 pagini
Modern man sees with one eye of faith and one eye of reason. Consequently, his view of history is confused. For centuries, the history of the Western world has been viewed from the Christian or classical standpoint—from a deep faith in the Kingdom of God or a belief in recurrent and eternal life-cycles. The modern mind, however, is neither Christian nor pagan—and its interpretations of history are Christian in derivation and anti-Christian in result. To develop this theory, Karl Löwith—beginning with the more accessible philosophies of history in the nineteenth and eighteenth centuries and working back to the Bible—analyzes the writings of outstanding historians both in antiquity and in Christian times. "A book of distinction and great importance. . . . The author is a master of philosophical interpretation, and each of his terse and substantial chapters has the balance of a work of art."—Helmut Kuhn, Journal of Philosophy
 

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Cuprins

INTRODUCTION
1
BURCKHARDT
20
MARX
33
HEGEL
52
PROGRESS VERSUS PROVIDENCE
60
1 Proudhon
61
2 Comte
67
3 Condorcet and Turgot
91
AUGUSTINE
160
OROSIUS
174
THE BIBLICAL VIEW OF HISTORY
182
CONCLUSION
191
EPILOGUE
204
MODERN TRANSFIGURATIONS OF JOACHISM
208
NIETZSCHES REVIVAL OF THE DOCTRINE OF ETERNAL RECURRENCE
214
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
223

VOLTAIRE
104
VICO
115
BOSSUET
137
JOACHIM
145

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Despre autor (1957)

Karl L 6with (1897-1973) was professor of philosophy at Heidelberg University, Germany.


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